Inside the Mexican town that supplies most of United States’ heroinhttps://indianexpress.com/photos/world-news/inside-the-mexican-town-that-supplies-most-of-united-states-heroin-5575139/

Inside the Mexican town that supplies most of United States’ heroin

Overdose deaths from opioids have increased almost six-fold in past two decades in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The year 2017 witnessed more than 15,000 deaths due to heroin overdose.

Inside the Mexican town that supplies most of United States' heroin

Mexico illegally farms opium which grew by more than one-fifth in 2018, almost to the size of Philadelphia, according to UN study which was published last year in November. (Reuters)

Inside the Mexican town that supplies most of United States' heroin

Due to an ever-growing expanse of pink poppy flowers, the price of opium paste has decreased so much that an average farmer in the mountains of Mexico's tropical sierra is worried that how will he feed his family. Opium paste is also the gummy raw ingredient of heroin. (Reuters)

Inside the Mexican town that supplies most of United States' heroin

Farmer Santiago Sanchez now earns a fifth of the average price he used to eanr two years ago. While the country's top drug traffickers are making millions, the villagers who are the bottom of this supply chain are hardly surviving. (Reuters)

Inside the Mexican town that supplies most of United States' heroin

Overdose deaths from opioids have increased almost six-fold in past two decades in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The year 2017 witnessed more than 15,000 deaths due to heroin overdose. (Reuters)

Inside the Mexican town that supplies most of United States' heroin

A majority of this illegal poppy cultivation takes place in the hills of Geurrero state which is about 800 miles south of the US-Mexican border and is now also among the country's bloodiest states. (Reuters)

Inside the Mexican town that supplies most of United States' heroin

Mexican president Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said last week that his government had offically ended its war against drug trafficking which was launched in 2006 by the military-led offensive. It had also led to an increase in violence in the region. (Reuters)