In Greenland, a glacier’s collapse shows climate impacthttps://indianexpress.com/photos/world-news/in-greenland-a-glaciers-collapse-shows-climate-impact-5365816/

In Greenland, a glacier’s collapse shows climate impact

The March mission was part of NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) project, a five-year, $30 million effort aimed at improving sea level rise projections by understanding how warming oceans are melting ice sheets from below - the most ambitious research on the subject to date

The March mission was part of NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) project, a five-year, $30 million effort aimed at improving sea level rise projections by understanding how warming oceans are melting ice sheets from below - the most ambitious research on the subject to date. (Source: Reuters)

Rising seas threaten low-lying cities, islands and industries worldwide. But projections for how high and how soon the rise will come vary wildly in part because scientists lack clarity on how fast warming oceans are melting polar ice sheets. (Source: Reuters)

The uncertainty confounds the preparations of governments and businesses and fuels the arguments of climate-change skeptics. In Pic: A glacial terminus is seen from the window during a NASA flight to support the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) research mission above the east coast of Greenland. (Source: Reuters)

A draft report by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), for example, predicts that seas are likely to rise between 33 centimeters and 1.33 meters by 2100 - a wider range than the 28-to-98 centimeters estimate in the last IPCC assessment from 2013. (Source: Reuters)

Higher seas are already creating more dangerous storm surges, the IPCC says, exacerbating flooding or coastal erosion from the U.S. Gulf Coast to the Maldives to China. In Pic: Earth Science Flight Programs Director at NASA, Eric Ianson, looks out at the Greenland ice sheet while inside a NASA Gulfstream III flying above Greenland to measure loss to the country's ice sheet as part of the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) research mission. (Source: Reuters)

Melting ice in Greenland currently adds 0.8 millimeters of water to global ocean levels annually, more than any other region, according to NASA. That’s enough water to fill 115 million Olympic-sized swimming pools. (Source: Reuters)

The IPCC draft says that the rate of sea level rise in 2100 will depend heavily on the effectiveness of governments in reducing fossil fuel pollution, which the U.N. panel says has been the dominant cause of global warming since the mid-20th century. (Source: Reuters)

Some of Greenland’s glaciers are disappearing more rapidly than others, and understanding why is a key goal of NASA’s mission. (Source: Reuters)

The importance of glacier change for global sea-level rise this century was not widely grasped in the scientific community until recently. (Source: Reuters)

In 1995, the IPCC’s second assessment said “little change in the extent of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets is expected over the next 50–100 years.” (Source: Reuters)