World War I – The assassination that changed the worldhttps://indianexpress.com/photos/picture-gallery-others/world-war-i-the-assassination-that-changed-the-world/

World War I – The assassination that changed the world

Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie were assassinated in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914, and event which eventually led to the outbreak of World War I.

A pistol used by one of the assassins of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand when he was shot to death in Sarajevo is on display at the Museum of Military History in Vienna, Austria, on Friday.
Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie were assassinated in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914, and event which eventually led to the outbreak of World War I. (Source: AP)

Pistols used by the assassins of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand when he was shot to death in Sarajevo are on display at the Museum of Military History in Vienna, Austria. (Source: AP)

The car in which Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie were shot to death is on display at the Museum of Military History in Vienna, Austria. (Source: AP)

The blood soaked uniform jacket worn by Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand when he was shot to death in Sarajevo is on display at the Museum of Military History in Vienna, Austria on Friday. (Source: AP)

The car in which Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie were shot to death is on display at the Museum of Military History in Vienna, Austria. (Source: AP)

The blood stained undershirt worn by Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand when he was shot to death in Sarajevo is on display at the Museum of Military History in Vienna, Austria. (Source: AP)

A bicycle from 1912 stands against a plaque listing the names of Belgian cyclists who died during World War I at the WielerMuseum in Roeselare, Belgium.
Three former winners of the Tour de France; Octave Lapize, Francois Faber and Lucien Petit-Breton all died fighting in World War I. Many more, both Belgian, French, German and Italian died serving their countries during the four years of war. (Source: AP)

An undated postcard provided by the WielerMuseum Roeselare, Belgian World War I soldiers with their foldable bicycles in Belgium during wartime. Late in the 19th century the Belgian Army took an interest in the newly emerging sport of cycling. A separate unit was created and came to be known as the Cyclist Riflemen. During World War I they played a key role in the Battle of Haelen in Belgium. The German Army nicknamed them the Black Devils, owing to their black outfits and hats, as well as their fast silent movements. (Source: AP)