The other side of Mumbai’s dance barshttps://indianexpress.com/photos/india-news/the-other-side-of-mumbais-dance-bars-photos-5573207/

The other side of Mumbai’s dance bars

As many as 700 dance bars across Mumbai and Maharashtra were shut down following the 2005 ban. The ban also pushed nearly 70,000 bar girls out of jobs, reportedly forcing many into prostitution

The other side of Mumbai's dance bars

The Supreme Court recently set aside certain provisions of a law imposing restrictions on the licensing and functioning of dance bars in Maharashtra. Modifying some of the provisions of the state law, the apex court permitted the bars to function from 6 pm to 11:30 pm and also allowed sale of liquor in the premises. (Express photo)

The other side of Mumbai's dance bars

As many as 700 dance bars across Mumbai and Maharashtra were shut down following the 2005 ban. The ban also pushed nearly 70,000 bar girls out of jobs, reportedly forcing many into prostitution. (Express photo: Amit Chakravarty)

The other side of Mumbai's dance bars

The Taxi Driver: Rajendra Prasad Pal started driving a black-and-yellow Fiat way back in 1996. By sheer chance, he had once parked near Congress House and later that evening few bar dancers requested him to drop them to a nearby bar. He started frequenting the neighbourhood and his income started touching more than Rs 10,000 a month in those days. Pal realised sticking to dance bars was his best bet. The ban affected him as well. Now, Pal earns only a little more than what he used to earn back then. (Express photo: Amit Chakravarty)

The other side of Mumbai's dance bars

The Tailor: In the eighties and the nineties, Faras Street never slept. It is estimated that between 50,000 and a lakh bar dancers lived in Faras Street and Congress House. Mohammed Shamshad, a tailor in this South Mumbai pocket, was supposed to get about Rs 10 lakh from the dancers. “Maine sab paison par mitti daal diya (I forgot all my money),” he said. (Express photo: Amit Chakravarty)

The other side of Mumbai's dance bars

The Hawker: The ban on bar dancers hit the hawkers hard- the feriwalas would go door-to-door selling make-up, hairclips and bangles. One such hawker, Jamal Ahmed, used to earn Rs 500-700 in a day till 2005 but now he barely earns Rs 100 a day. (Express photo: Amit Chakravarty)

The other side of Mumbai's dance bars

The Waiter: The waiters at these dance bars who had grown old in the trade were also affected. They waited for the ban to be lifted. It did but only for a brief period of time. Padmanabha Shetty, working at Nataraj Hotel for the past 22 years, recounts that the tips would go upto Rs 1,500-2,000 a day. Follwing the ban, Shetty recieved about Rs 100-150 per day, out of which Rs 70 was spent in commuting.(Express photo: Amit Chakravarty)