Kumbh Mela 2019: What it takes to clean the world’s largest religious gatheringhttps://indianexpress.com/photos/india-news/kumbh-mela-2019-what-it-takes-to-clean-the-worlds-largest-religious-gathering-5549801/

Kumbh Mela 2019: What it takes to clean the world’s largest religious gathering

A total of 20,000 sanitation workers have been employed for the cleaning of the Kumbh Mela — half by the Health Department and the rest through outsourced vendors.

With the Yogi Adityanath government making the Kumbh Mela a prestige project, and tagging it as Swachh Kumbh to fit in with the Centre’s Swachhta campaign, Rs 234 crore out of the the total budget of Rs 4,200 crore has been allocated only for sanitation — this includes renting and setting up the portable toilets, buying equipment and disinfectants, paying wages, and providing dustbins and brooms. (Express photo: Abhinav Saha)

The Kumbh Mela began on January 15 and will go on till March 4. Kumbh Mela is celebrated four times over a course of 12 years. More than 12 crore people are expected to take part in the event in the course of these 50 days.(Express photo: Abhinav Saha)

A total of 20,000 sanitation workers have been employed for the cleaning of the Kumbh Mela — half by the Health Department and the rest through outsourced vendors. (Express photo: Abhinav Saha)

From 35,000 toilets at the last Kumbh held in then-Allahabad in 2013, to 1.2 lakh toilets now, the difference is telling. Of the 1.2 lakh toilets, 62,500 community toilets are planned for bus stops, parking lots and the roads, 20,000 of them urinals; while 40,000 ‘institutional’ ones are to be put inside akhadas and tent cities. (Express photo: Abhinav Saha)

Approximately 1,500 swachhgrihis have been deployed only to check open defecation. (Express photo: Abhinav Saha)

One major criticism the Health Department has faced is absence of water taps in the toilets. The other criticism is the shortage of masks or gloves for the sanitation workers who have to pick up human excreta with their bare hands. (Express photo: Abhinav Saha)

The toilets at the banks of the Triveni-Sangam have septic tanks attached in order to stop the water from getting discharged in the river water. Suction vehicles are stationed near the complexes a night before the peak days such as Shahi Snaan. (Express photo: Abhinav Saha)