scorecardresearch
Saturday, Nov 26, 2022

Pakistan court rejects Musharraf’s plea seeking to lift travel ban

Counsel said keeping Musharraf's name on the ECL was a violation of fundamental rights.

Former Pakistani dictator Pervez Musharraf’s plea seeking to lift foreign travel ban was on Monday rejected by a Pakistani court,saying the matter did not fall under its authority.

The Sindh High Court refused to remove his name from the Exit Control List (ECL) and advised 70-year-old Musharraf’s advocate to refer the matter to the government.

The government had barred Musharraf from leaving Pakistan after he was arrested for his alleged involvement in three criminal cases,including the murder of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto.

The former military ruler had later received bail in all the cases. However,his name was not removed from the Interior Ministry’s ECL that bars him from travelling abroad.

Subscriber Only Stories
Delhi Confidential: A ‘night sky sanctuary’ in Ladakh, India&...Premium
For minority voters in Gujarat, more of same on offer; ‘no enthusiasm’ ab...Premium
Constitution Day: A rare, enduring documentPremium
Anurag Kashyap on his dark phase: ‘I imploded, went off Twitter, we...Premium

Musharraf’s counsel had moved the court,stating his client wanted to be with his 95-year-old ailing mother in Dubai after his release on bail,and that keeping his client’s name on the ECL was a violation of fundamental rights.

The Attorney General on Monday said that Musharraf’s name was put on the list because of criminal cases against him and the petition should be disposed off.

Musharraf,also an accused in the murder of Balochistan nationalist leader Akbar Bugti,has also been charged for committing high treason for abrogating Pakistan’s Constitution during his 1999-2008 rule. He had imposed emergency rule in November 2007 and suspended the constitution.

First published on: 23-12-2013 at 02:24:43 pm
Next Story

England add Scott Borthwick and James Tredwell to Ashes squad

Latest Comment
Post Comment
Read Comments
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
close