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Wednesday, October 28, 2020

US Elections 2020 Highlights: New Congress could have more Indian Americans to the House

Trump appears to be trailing not only in national polling, but also in key battleground surveys.

By: Express Web Desk | New Delhi | Updated: October 19, 2020 10:54:43 am
President Donald Trump speaks at a rally to support law enforcement at Southern Wisconsin Regional Airport, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020, in Janesville, Wis. (Scott P. Yates/Rockford Register Star via AP)

 President Donald Trump Saturday campaigned in Michigan as part of a swing through states that he won in the 2016 polls.  Addressing a rally in Muskegon, Michigan, Trump painted the Democrats as “anti-American radicals” on a crusade against American history. “The Democrat party you once knew doesn’t exist,” he highlighted. The president also leaned into fear tactics and accused the “left” of  erasing American history, purging American values and destroying the American way of life.

The tour comes Trump faces headwinds not only in national polling, which shows Democrat Joe Biden leading, but also in key battleground surveys. And it comes after the campaign largely retreated from TV advertising in the Midwest, shifting much of its money to Sun Belt states such as Florida, North Carolina, Arizona and Georgia, as well as Pennsylvania.

Joe Biden on the other hand planned no public events on Saturday.

Before this, Trump was  campaigning in Florida and Georgia, neighbouring states he carried four years ago and must win again to extend his presidency. His decision to devote Friday evening’s prime-time slot to Georgia in particular highlighted the serious nature of his challenge in the 2020 contest’s closing days: Far from his original plan to expand into Democratic-leaning states, he is labouring to stave off a defeat of major proportions. No Republican presidential candidate has lost Georgia since George H.W. Bush in 1992.

 

Live Blog

Donald Trump and Joe Biden to headline dueling town halls on Thursday; Biden raised $383 million for his election effort in September; Elections are set to take place on November 3. Follow this space for more LIVE updates.

21:33 (IST)18 Oct 2020
‘Please like me,’ Trump begged. For many women, it’s way too late

For much of the country, polarized views about the US president and his chaotic upending of American politics haven’t budged since 2016, when he squeezed out a narrow Electoral College victory while losing the popular vote. Yet, there is a demographic group that has changed its mind: white women in the suburbs.

In 2016, the suburbs powered Trump’s victory, with exit polls showing that he won those areas by four points. Now, polling in swing states shows the president losing those voters by historic margins, fueled by a record-breaking gender gap. Biden leads by 23 points among suburban women in battleground states, according to recent polling by The New York Times and Siena College. Among men, the race is tied. READ MORE

19:41 (IST)18 Oct 2020
Outrage over mispronunciation of Kamala Harris' name, supporters launch online campaign

Outraged over the mispronunciation of Democratic vice-presidential nominee Kamala Harris' name by a Republican Senator from Georgia, her supporters launched an online campaign with the hashtags 'MyNameIs' and 'IstandwithKamala'.

During an election rally of US President Donald Trump on Saturday in Macon City in Georgia, a battleground state, Senator David Perdue mispronounced 55-year-old Harris' name.

"KAH'-mah-lah? Kah-MAH'-lah? Kamala-mala-mala? I don't know. Whatever," he told thousands of his supporters. The mispronunciation outraged a large number of Harris' supporters and her spokesperson Sabrina Singh said, "I'll keep it simple: If you can pronounce 'former' Senator David Perdue, you can pronounce 'future' Vice President Kamala Harris."

Condemning Perdue, Amit Jani -- the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Outreach Coordinator of the Biden campaign -- launched the 'My name is' campaign to "push back against the bigotry". (PTI)

17:48 (IST)18 Oct 2020
US polls: New Congress could have more Indian Americans to the House

The upcoming US elections on November 3 could very well see the expansion of the so called 'Samosa Caucus', a termed coined by Congressman Raja Krishnamoorthi for informal grouping of Indian-American lawmakers, according to the latest Congressional polls coming from states.

The "Samosa caucus" comprises of five Indian-American lawmakers, including four members of the House of Representatives and Senator and Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris.

In the House of Representatives, senior most Dr Ami Bera, Congressmen Ro Khanna and Krishnamoorthi along with Pramila Jayapal, who is the first and the only Indian American women in the House, are projected to be re-elected on November 3. Jayapal, 55, in the new Congress next year is likely to have company from Dr Hiral Tipirneni.

Tripirneni, the emergency room physician is leading, though by a narrow margin, against Republican incumbent David Schweikert in the sixth Congressional District of Arizona.

He has been endorsed by top leaders of the Democratic party, including former vice president Joe Biden, the presidential candidate. (PTI)

17:44 (IST)18 Oct 2020
Biden and Trump say they’re fighting for America’s ‘soul’: What does that mean?

That the election has become a referendum on the soul of the nation, suggests that in an increasingly secular country, voting has become a reflection of one’s individual morality — and that the outcome hinges in part on spiritual and philosophical questions that transcend politics: What, exactly, is the soul of the nation? What is the state of it? And what would it mean to save it?

The answers go beyond a campaign slogan, beyond politics and November, to the identity and future of the American experiment itself, especially now, with a pandemic that has wearied the country’s spirit. Read more

15:44 (IST)18 Oct 2020
Economy, pandemic overshadow climate for young US voters

The two dozen students who signed up for air pollution expert James Goldstene's advanced environmental studies class all say they
are deeply passionate about fighting climate change.But when it comes to voting in the U.S. presidential
election, many said climate change was not their top issue.Their priorities ahead of the Nov. 3 election reflect those
of the wider electorate: the battered U.S. economy, the COVID-19 pandemic and racial justice. "I know everybody’s biggest issue right now within this class is environment. And it’s super important to me but another thing that I feel is more important personally because I'm an African-American woman is race," said Kelia Surrency, 23."The environment is 100% important to me, but I need someonein that office that doesn't look at the Black community as lesser-than."

Many in the class at California State University, Sacramento, were having trouble finding entry-level jobs or internships in the COVID-wracked economy, said Goldstene, a former top California air pollution regulator."With COVID going on and a lot of people losing their jobs and struggling, worrying about how they are going to pay for stuff. I think that does overshadow climate," said another
student, Enrique Dominguez, 23. Reuters

13:42 (IST)18 Oct 2020
US elections 2020: Indian students unsure if America is still their land of dreams

For Indians studying in America, the November elections hold a crucial key in determining the immigration policies that the country might take in future. At present, Indians constitute the second largest group of international students in the US after China. As per the 2019 US Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange, India sent more than 202,000 students to America at various levels of education in the years 2018-19, which was an increase of about three percent from the previous year.

Reasons for applying to the US among students include the country housing several of the top ranking universities of the world, a sought-after academic environment, as well as better funding opportunities. However, developments over immigration policies and uncertainties with regard to Visa rules are some of the reasons why many Indians students are keenly awaiting the elections in November. (Read Adrija Roychowdhury's report here)

13:14 (IST)18 Oct 2020
Watch| Where does Biden and Trump stand in the polls

12:40 (IST)18 Oct 2020
Trump blasts Michigan governor Whitmer

U.S. President Donald Trump, who played down the coronavirus pandemic from its onset, criticized Michigan’s Democratic Governor Gretchen Whitmer on Saturday for her policies to curb the outbreak, drawing shouts of “lock her up” from a rally crowd.

12:14 (IST)18 Oct 2020
US polls: New Congress could have more Indian Americans to the House

The upcoming US elections on November 3 could very well see the expansion of the so called “Samosa Caucus”, a termed coined by Congressman Raja Krishnamoorthi for informal grouping of Indian-American lawmakers, according to the latest Congressional polls coming from states.

The “Samosa caucus” comprises of five Indian-American lawmakers, including four members of the House of Representatives and Senator and Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris. (Read more here)

11:21 (IST)18 Oct 2020
Thousands protest Trump’s Supreme Court pick at Washington Women’s March

Thousands marched to the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on Saturday to commemorate the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and protest President Donald Trump’s rush to push through Amy Coney Barrett as her replacement.

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee has scheduled an Oct. 22 vote on the nomination of Barrett, a conservative appellate judge, over objections from Democrats that the confirmation process comes too close to the Nov. 3 presidential election. (Read more here)

09:44 (IST)18 Oct 2020
Biden is a "corrupt politician", his family is a "criminal enterprise," says Trump

Taking to Twitter, President Donald Trump continued his attacks against his Democratic rival Joe Biden by calling him "a living embodiment of a corrupt political class" and claiming that his family is a criminal enterprise. Trump accused Biden of declining America's economic prosperity and taking away jobs from people. "For the last 47 years, Joe Biden shipped away your jobs, shut down your factories, threw open your borders, and ravaged our cities," he claimed.

09:21 (IST)18 Oct 2020
Trump leans into fear tactics in bid to win Midwest states

President Donald Trump leaned into fear tactics Saturday as he accused the left of trying to 'erase American history, purge American values and destroy the American way of life 'in a late reelection pitch to voters in Michigan. 'The Democrat Party you once knew doesn't exist,'' Trump told voters in Muskegon, Michigan, ahead of a rally in Wisconsin _ two states in the Upper Midwest that were instrumental to his 2016 victory but may now be slipping from his grasp.

As he tried to keep more voters from turning against him, Trump sought to paint Democrats as 'anti-American radicals'' on a 'crusade against American history.' He told moderate voters they had a 'a moral duty'' to join the Republican Party.

09:17 (IST)18 Oct 2020
Outrage over mispronunciation of Kamala Harris' name, supporters launch online campaign

Outraged over the mispronunciation of vice-presidential nominee Kamala Harris' name by a Republican Senator from Georgia, her supporters launched an online campaign with the hashtags 'MyNameIs' and 'IstandwithKamala'.

Several people gave the origin and meaning of their names as they expressed outrage at the mispronunciation of the vice-presidential candidate's name.

During an election rally of US President Donald Trump on Saturday in Macon City in Georgia, a battle ground state, Republican Senator David Perdue mispronounced 55-year-old Harris' name. "KAH'-mah-lah? Kah-MAH'-lah? Kamala-mala-mala? I don't know. Whatever," he told thousands of his supporters. (PTI)

00:10 (IST)18 Oct 2020
Trump on defense, courting voters in two must-win states

Backed into a corner and facing financial strains, President Donald Trump went after his opponent's family and defended his own struggle to contain the pandemic on Friday as he fought to energize his sagging reelection bid in the nation's Sunbelt. With Election Day looming, Democrat Joe Biden pushed to keep voters focused on health care in the Midwest.

Trump was campaigning in Florida and Georgia, neighbouring states he carried four years ago and must win again to extend his presidency.

His decision to devote Friday evening's prime-time slot to Georgia in particular highlighted the serious nature of his challenge in the 2020 contest's closing days: Far from his original plan to expand into Democratic-leaning states, he is laboUring to stave off a defeat of major proportions.

No Republican presidential candidate has lost Georgia since George H.W. Bush in 1992. And earlier this week, Trump had to court voters in Iowa, a state he carried by almost 10 points four years ago. (AP)

21:07 (IST)17 Oct 2020
Joe Biden extends wishes to those celebrating Navratri
16:56 (IST)17 Oct 2020
Trump on defense, courting voters in two must-win states

Backed into a corner and facing financial strains, President Donald Trump went after his opponent's family and defended his own struggle to contain the pandemic on Friday as he fought to energize his sagging reelection bid in the nation's Sunbelt. With Election Day looming, Democrat Joe Biden pushed to keep voters focused on health care in the Midwest.

Trump was campaigning in Florida and Georgia, neighbouring states he carried four years ago and must win again to extend his presidency.

His decision to devote Friday evening's prime-time slot to Georgia in particular highlighted the serious nature of his challenge in the 2020 contest's closing days: Far from his original plan to expand into Democratic-leaning states, he is laboUring to stave off a defeat of major proportions. No Republican presidential candidate has lost Georgia since George H.W. Bush in 1992.(AP)

16:37 (IST)17 Oct 2020
For Trump, city where 'bad things happen' looms large

When President Donald Trump told the world that "bad things happen in Philadelphia," it was, in part, a blunt assessment of his party's struggles in the nation's sixth-most populous city.

For decades, Philadelphia has been the cornerstone of Democratic victories in the battleground state - producing Democratic margins so massive that winning statewide has been a longshot for most Republican presidential candidates.

But it's a longshot Trump pulled off in 2016 and is trying to repeat again.

His debate stage disdain for the City of Brotherly Love - which quickly inspired memes and T-shirts - underscored his campaign's months-long effort to fight the blue tide that starts in the city. (AP)

14:43 (IST)17 Oct 2020
Watch| Social media and the US Elections

14:34 (IST)17 Oct 2020
Trump on defense, courting voters in two must-win states

Backed into a corner and facing financial strains, President Donald Trump went after his opponent's family and defended his own struggle to contain the pandemic on Friday as he fought to energize his sagging reelection bid in the nation's Sunbelt.

With Election Day looming, Democrat Joe Biden pushed to keep voters focused on health care in the Midwest. Trump was campaigning in Florida and Georgia, neighbouring states he carried four years ago and must win again to extend his presidency. His decision to devote Friday evening's prime-time slot to Georgia in particular highlighted the serious nature of his challenge in the 2020 contest's closing days: Far from his original plan to expand into Democratic-leaning states, he is laboUring to stave off a defeat of major proportions.

No Republican presidential candidate has lost Georgia since George H.W. Bush in 1992.

14:32 (IST)17 Oct 2020
Life on the line: Early voters wait 'as long as it takes'

Americans are accustomed to standing in line. They queue up for airport security, the latest iPhone, COVID tests, concerts or food. But the line of voters building before sunrise outside Mallard Creek High School in a distant suburb of Charlotte, North Carolina, on Thursday was different. It was a living chain of hundreds of people who stepped into place _ around the building, down some stairs and past a fleet of idled yellow school buses _ determined to be counted in the elemental civic ritual of voting, which seems even more consequential in the bitterly fought 2020 presidential election. "If you want the United States to remain united, you need to vote,'' said Monique Sutton, 52 and a nurse practitioner. "Because if we get any further away from each other, I don't know that we'll ever be able to come back.''(AP)

us presidential election, us election news, us election 2020 news, us presidential election 2020, us election, us election 2020, us elections, us election candidates, us president election 2020 polls, donald trump, donald trump news, us election polls, us election polls, us election result date, mike pence, kamala harris, kamala harris news, kamala harris us election 2020 U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during the first 2020 presidential campaign debate with Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, held on the campus of the Cleveland Clinic at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., September 29, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

US President Donald Trump has described his presidential challenger Joe Biden as “the single worst candidate in the history of America”, referring to a few recent gaffes of the Democratic leader. “I’m running against the single worst candidate in the history of American presidential politics and you know what that does? That puts more pressure on me. Can you imagine if you lose to a guy like this?” Trump told his supporters in the battleground state of Pennsylvania on Tuesday.

Meanwhile, top US public health official Anthony Fauci, in an interview with CBS Evening News, said that Trump is no longer capable of spreading the novel coronavirus and can attend a town hall on Thursday without putting others at risk. Fauci said that he and his colleague Clifford Lane at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) concluded this after reviewing all the COVID-19 tests taken by the president as well as an additional test conducted at an NIH laboratory.

On the other hand, a survey has found that while almost half of Indian Americans approve of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s performance, they remain steadfastly Democratic despite the apparent courtship between Modi and US President Donald Trump — 68 per cent plan to vote for Joe Biden and 22 per cent for Trump.

The survey, by Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Pennsylvania, and released on Wednesday, however, found that Indian Americans voting for incumbent Trump have a much more favourable view of Modi (at a rating of 76 out of 100) than those voting for Democratic candidate Biden (52/100).

The survey comes even as the 41.61 lakh-strong community finds its voting choices in the spotlight given one, their view on politics back in India and two, the Democrats’ choice of Indian-origin Kamala Harris as vice-presidential candidate. “While Republicans are more bullish on Modi, it is worth pointing out that Democrats still largely view him favourably. The simple notion that Trump supporters are Modi supporters and Modi opponents are Trump opponents does not find support,” Milan Vaishnav, lead researcher and Senior Fellow, South Asia Program at Carnegie, told The Indian Express.

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