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UK economy won’t stay close to EU after Brexit: Chancellor of Exchequer Sajid Javid

The debate over how much Britain will diverge from the EU with regards to regulatory standards is set to form a key plank for how the talks progress -- a no-deal Brexit could create border delays and increase costs for carmakers and other manufacturers.

By: Bloomberg | Published: January 18, 2020 8:32:47 pm
Sajid Javid, Cyrus Mistry, Tata Steel, Port Talbot, Tata steel Port Talbot, Sajid Javid twitter, Brexit, EU referendum, news, latest news, India news, national news, Mumbai news, Department for Business Innovation and Skills, UK business, Hartlepool, Rotherham, Stocksbridge, Britain EU business, Tata Steel Brexit, Tata Brexit Any move to start negotiations with the US before trade talks with the EU get fully under way could send a strong message to the EU that Britain wants to break free of European regulations. It could also further complicate discussions with Brussels.

UK Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid signaled Britain is planning to shift its economy further away from the European Union’s, firing an early salvo in what’s set to be a fractious year in hammering out their future relationship.

“There will not be alignment, we will not be a ruletaker, we will not be in the single market and we will not be in the customs union — and we will do this by the end of the year,” Javid said in an interview with the Financial Times.

Javid’s comments, coupled with a report in the Daily Telegraph that Prime Minister Boris Johnson is planning to formally open trade talks with the US as soon as next month, suggest Britain is seeking to put early pressure on the EU’s trade team even before the UK officially quits the bloc on Jan. 31.

The UK government is speeding up plans for trade negotiations with the US, the Telegraph reported, with civil servants preparing advice for ministers and Johnson poised to seek authorization from the cabinet to start talks with the U.S. next month possibly during a trip to Washington.

Any move to start negotiations with the US before trade talks with the EU get fully under way could send a strong message to the EU that Britain wants to break free of European regulations. It could also further complicate discussions with Brussels.

Talks with the EU already face a daunting schedule this year, with the EU probably agreeing on its formal negotiating mandate only in late February and the official transition period expiring on Dec. 31. Johnson says that deadline is immovable, while EU Chief Negotiator Michel Barnier calls it “extremely challenging.”

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has warned that the further the UK goes it alone, the more it will be regarded in Brussels as a direct competitor.

The debate over how much Britain will diverge from the EU with regards to regulatory standards is set to form a key plank for how the talks progress — a no-deal Brexit could create border delays and increase costs for carmakers and other manufacturers.

“There will be an impact on business one way or the other, some will benefit, some won’t,” Javid said in the Financial Times interview, urging companies to adjust their strategies accordingly. He plans to back more projects in regions outside London and the southeast, and pump more funds into training the country’s workforce.

The government must not treat the right to diverge from EU regulation as an obligation, according to Carolyn Fairbairn, director general of the CBI, the country’s biggest business lobby group.

“For some firms, divergence brings value,” Fairbairn said. “But for many others, alignment supports jobs and competitiveness – particularly in some of the most deprived regions of the U.K.”

As for the UK’s finances, Javid said he wants to bolster growth rates to between 2.7% and 2.8% a year. Improving productivity, which has been a brake on the economy for several years, is also an issue he’s seeking to address, he told the FT.

Labour’s John McDonnell said on Twitter that trade will be harmed, putting jobs at risk.

“Fears now made real about food price increases & threats to jobs in motor industry & manufacturing. Right Ideology overriding common sense,” McDonnell said in response to Javid’s comments.

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