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Wednesday, January 26, 2022

World news round-up: 5 overnight developments from around the globe

Good morning! Begin your day with five key overnight stories from around the world.

By: Express Web Desk | New Delhi |
Updated: December 3, 2021 8:58:53 am
Take a look at what happened in the world in the last 24 hours.

Here is a round-up of the top developments around the world today.

 

1.Harvard University becomes 1st Ivy League to add caste as protected category for student workers

IISc Bangalore In the world universities, Harvard University has been rated the best university in the world (File)

Harvard University has added caste as a protected category for all graduate and undergraduate student worker, becoming the first Ivy Leagyue school to do so. The historic addition marks Harvard to have caste equity protection in its non-discrimination clause for unionised student workers. This decision will impact more than 4,900 student workers at Harvard and the surrounding Harvard community, Equity Labs said in a statement.

“Driven in partnership with caste-oppressed community members, this win is part of a larger national movement for caste equity that aims to protect caste-oppressed students, workers, and communities across the country,” it added. With this addition, Harvard joins UC Davis, Colby College, Brandeis University, and several other universities where students, faculty, and staff face caste-based discrimination.

2.Gita Gopinath to take on new role at IMF as First Deputy Managing Director

IMF Chief Economist Gita Gopinath (Image: Reuters)

Indian-American Gita Gopinath, the chief economist of International Monetary Fund, is being promoted as IMF’s First Deputy Managing Director, the fund announced Thursday.

She would replace Geoffrey Okamoto who plans to leave the Fund early next year. Gopinath, who was scheduled to return to her academic position at Harvard University in January 2022, has served as the IMF’s chief economist for three years. “Both Geoffrey and Gita are tremendous colleagues — I am sad to see Geoffrey go but, at the same time, I am delighted that Gita has decided to stay and accept the new responsibility of being our FDMD,” said Kristalina Georgieva, IMF’s Managing Director.

3.Omicron may soon cause over half of Covid infections in Europe: EU

The European Union’s public health agency said on Thursday that the Omicron variant could be responsible for more than half of all Covid-19 infections in Europe within a few months.

The estimate could lend weight to preliminary information about the very high transmissibility of the Omicron variant, above that of the Delta variant, which before Omicron was considered the most contagious of the main coronavirus strains.

“Based on mathematical modelling conducted by ECDC, there are indications that Omicron could cause over half of all SARS-CoV-2 infections in the EU/EEA within the next few months,” the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control said in a statement.

4.Biden to restart Trump-era border program forcing asylum seekers to wait in Mexico

Mexico, Mexico migrants Tents used by migrants seeking asylum in the United States line an entrance to the border crossing, Monday, March 1, 2021, in Tijuana, Mexico. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

The Biden administration will restart the contentious Trump-era border program that forces asylum seekers to wait in Mexico for US immigration hearings, in keeping with a federal court order.

Biden ended the Trump policy known as the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP) soon after his inauguration in January as part of a promise to implement what he called a more humane approach to immigration. But a federal judge ruled Biden’s rescission did not follow proper procedure and in August ordered the policy’s reinstatement.

President Joe Biden, a Democrat, has struggled in his first year in office to reverse many hardline immigration policies put in place by his Republican predecessor, Donald Trump, and is acing a record number of migrant arrests at the U.S.-Mexico border.

5.Alec Baldwin says he assumed gun in movie set shooting was safe

Alec Baldwin Alec Baldwin speaks on the phone in the parking lot outside the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office in Santa Fe, N.M., after he was questioned about a shooting on the set of the film Rust on the outskirts of Santa Fe, Thursday, Oct. 21, 2021. (Jim Weber/Santa Fe New Mexican via AP)

Alec Baldwin said on Thursday he assumed the gun he was holding was empty of live bullets before it went off and killed a cinematographer during a rehearsal last month on the set of his Western movie “Rust.”

In an emotional television interview, the actor also said he did not see any safety issues on the set before the accident.”We both assumed the gun was empty other than those, you know, dummy rounds,” Baldwin told ABC television’s George Stephanopoulos in his first public comments about the Oct. 21 shooting. The actor had been handed the gun by a crew member and told it was safe .He said he did not pull the trigger.”I would never point a gun at anyone and pull a trigger at them,” Baldwin said.

 

 

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