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Browser history reveals Germanwings co-pilot searched on ways to commit suicide

Investigators said that co-pilot Andreas Lubitz had "looked for information on ways to commit suicide".

By: Agencies | Dusseldorf |
April 2, 2015 8:58:49 pm
germanwings crash, germanwings, andreas lubitz, lufthansa, france, germany, angela merkel This is an undated image taken from Facebook of Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz in San Francisco California (AP photo)

German state prosecutors said on Thursday they believe the co-pilot who crashed a Germanwings plane in the French Alps last week had searched on a computer for ways to commit suicide shortly before the crash which killed 150 people.

In a statement, prosecutors in Duesseldorf said the computer, which they had found in his home, also showed searches on cockpit doors and safety precautions related to them.

They said the co-pilot, Andreas Lubitz, had “looked for information on ways to commit suicide” in computer searches that took place between March 16 and 23, one day before the crash.

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“On at least one day, the person had for several minutes undertaken searches related to cockpit doors and their safety precautions,” it added.

The second black box from the Germanwings plane that crashed in the French Alps last week has been found after a nine-day search, prosecutors said today.

Authorities are hoping to unearth more clues about the disaster from the black box after the first voice recorder suggested that co-pilot Andreas Lubitz deliberately flew the plane into a mountain.

Germanwings second black box found

The second black box records technical flight data that could provide vital insights into the final moments of Flight 4U9525 before it crashed last Tuesday, killing all 150 people on board.

The first black box, found the same day as the crash, recorded conversations between Lubitz and the pilot and showed that the 27-year-old German was alone at the time of the crash.

He apparently took advantage of the captain’s brief absence to lock him out and set the plane on a deadly descent into the Alps.

The plane smashed into the mountains at a speed of 700 kilometres an hour, instantly killing all 150 people on board
— half of them German and more than 50 from Spain. According to prosecutors, the voice recorder suggested that the passengers were unaware of what was going to happen to them until the very last seconds, when screams were heard.

Rescue workers have since been sifting through the wreckage for days trying to identify body parts and victims via their DNA.

The search for evidence has been hampered by the extremely difficult mountain terrain as well as the force of
the crash.

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