With #OnTinderAtTinder, Tinderatis give the real picturehttps://indianexpress.com/article/trending/trending-globally/with-ontinderattinder-tinderatis-give-the-real-picture/

With #OnTinderAtTinder, Tinderatis give the real picture

Tinderatis took to Twitter with the viral hashtag #OnTinderAtTinder, while uploading not-so-flattering pictures of themselves alongside their carefully constructed selfies.

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What people look like when they are ‘on Tinder’ and when they are looking ‘at Tinder’. (Pictured here: Lauren Grigor, a Tinder user, Source: Twitter)

Past research has showed that on an average, Tinder users make five attempts before uploading their selfies. Social media allows us to present ourselves at our best — we can choose to not upload bad hair days, no-make-up looks, bed hair, just-out-of-bed looks, or simply that unflattering dress that does nothing to enhance your curves or conceal that flab. It is, thus, notable that from time to time, Netizens shed their deliberately styled looks to reveal their true selves at their worst — pre-coffee morning face, red eyes, dishevelled hair, sweatpants instead of yoga pants…essentially the selves we reveal only after reaching a certain level of comfort in a relationship when you can dress down without fear of judgement. Celebrities have headlined this trend in the past, inspiring the rest to do the same without shame.

So, recently Tinderatis took to Twitter with the viral hashtag #OnTinderAtTinder, while uploading not-so-flattering pictures of themselves alongside their carefully-constructed selfies. #OnTinderAtTinder was initiated by the humour site Someecards.com, and got picked up by the rest. “I thought it was refreshing. It’s honest. It pokes fun at the way we don’t show our true selves online, versus in reality,” said Kash Baloch, a 28-year-old pre-school teacher from Toronto.

 

Sharron Paul, a 29-year-old comedian in Brooklyn, shared her crazy-cat-lady avatar by posing with her cat, “That’s literally me chilling at home on a Sunday night with my hair scarf on and my cat sitting there like a parrot.” What she loves about this trend is that it is “taking a jab at all those people — mostly guys — who are always talking about ‘makeup is a such a lie’ and all that nonsense. Here it is without all the flash and the glamour.”

 

How do you prefer it?