Looking for a unique present? This Valentine’s Day you can gift a rare heart-shaped meteoritehttps://indianexpress.com/article/trending/trending-globally/this-valentines-day-you-can-gift-a-rare-heart-shaped-meteorite-5566013/

Looking for a unique present? This Valentine’s Day you can gift a rare heart-shaped meteorite

The one-of-a-kind gift, the 320 million-year-old rare astronomic item could be yours if you join the online auction bid starting from February 6 through February 14 this year.

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The rare meteorite is called the ‘Heart of Space’. (Source: Christie’s)

As Valentine’s Day is around the corner, people are scouting for gifting options to present it to their beloved. And while some may be satisfied with the usual gifting ideas from chocolates to jewellery, one lucky one this year could gift a rare meteorite to his or her beloved!

Yes, this Valentine’s Day people are all set to bid for a heart-shaped meteorite. The one-of-a-kind gift, the 320 million-year-old rare astronomic item could be yours if you join the online auction bid starting from February 6 through February 14 this year.

The London-based auction house, Christie’s, which is hosting the bidding procedure said the Russian meteorite know as “The Heart of Space” came from a meteoroid that created a fireball over the Sikhote-Alin Mountains in Siberia in 1947. It measures 9 inches across at its widest point and weighs over 10 kilograms.

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But in case you’re planning to join the bid, it is going to cost you quite a lot. Christie’s estimates bidding could reach as high as $500,000 (Rs 3.5 crore).

To woo its probable customers, the auction house in its description called it “a very rarely seen shape which is the result of the fortuitous cleavage along its crystalline planes.”

Describing the details how the meteorite entered the Earth on February 12, 1947, it said, “Upon slamming into the atmosphere, it began to break apart and created a fireball brighter than the Sun as it sailed over the Sikhote-Alin Mountains in Siberia. The shockwaves from the low altitude explosion of the main mass collapsed chimneys, shattered windows and uprooted trees.”

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It also provided other trivia about the space object and said how the collision and its impact was popular among artists as well. “A famous painting of the event by artist and eye-witness PI Medvedev was reproduced as a postage stamp issued by the Soviet government in 1957 to commemorate what many likened to what was seemingly the end of the world.”