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Friday, September 17, 2021

‘Shame on you’: Shahid Afridi’s remarks about Taliban’s love for cricket cause uproar

"Taliban have come with a very positive mind. They're allowing ladies to work. And I believe Taliban like cricket a lot" Shahid Afridi said talking to the press. His comments have caused an uproar.

By: Trends Desk | New Delhi |
Updated: September 1, 2021 10:15:58 am
Shahid AfridiAfridi's remarks while praising Taliban's positive mindset drew flak online. (File)

As thousands of Afghans are desperately fleeing the country after Taliban took over, Pakistan’s former cricket captain Shahid Afridi is drawing flak online after finding “positivity” in the militant’s attitude. The cricketer said that compared to the past, Taliban seem to be “positive” this time as they are “allowing women to work, including politics”. As the world seemed concerned with Taliban seizing control, Afridi shared his opinion about the future of cricket in Afghanistan, adding “Taliban support and love cricket.”

Afridi made the remarks while he was speaking to the media in Karachi and said that the next Pakistan Super League (PSL) might be his last. He said he would love to play for Quetta Gladiators, GEO News reported.

His shocking remarks quickly went viral, raising eyebrows across the world. His stance is quite different from Afghan cricketers and sportspersons, who have condemned Taliban’s takeover. Many have even left the country, afraid of repercussions. Many also shared older videos of him where he spoke derisively about women playing cricket.

While most slammed him for his “insensitive” comment, other trolled him with sarcastic tweets.

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