scorecardresearch
Follow Us:
Friday, September 24, 2021

New Zealand website sells ‘charpai’ for $800, calls it a ‘vintage Indian daybed’

While not much is written about the product on the website, except it being "original" and "one of a kind", according to the company's Facebook page, it has suppliers all over Asia, India and the Middle East.

By: Trends Desk | New Delhi |
Updated: September 1, 2021 9:28:46 pm
New Zealand website sells 'Vintage Indian Daybed 41,000, charpoy for $800, ANNABELLE’S charpai, charpoy, trending, indian express, indian express newsThe product was originally priced at $1200.

Days after luxury fashion house Balenciaga caught the attention of netizens for selling bags resembling “desi thailas” for Rs 1.5 lakh, a New Zealand retailer was spotted selling ‘charpai’ — a traditional woven bed — for $800. (Rs 58,000).

The official website of ANNABELLE’S — a home decor store — features a cot titled “vintage Indian daybed’. The bed, like many seen across India, is a jute handwoven cot commonly known as “charpai” or “chorpay”. The product was originally priced at $1200.

The ‘charpai’ is being sold for $ 800 on the website. (Source: annabelles.nz)

While not much is written about the product on the website, except it being “original” and “one of a kind”, according to the company’s Facebook page, it has suppliers all over Asia, India and the Middle East.

However, this is not the first time an old-fashioned charpai or khatiya is being sold in the international market. Earlier, an advertisement featuring a basic ‘charpoy’ had gone viral on social media.

The desi bed, which was described as a “traditional Indian daybed”, was being sold at a whopping $990. The advertisement also claimed that the product was “100% Australian made”.

📣 The Indian Express is now on Telegram. Click here to join our channel (@indianexpress) and stay updated with the latest headlines

For all the latest Trending News, download Indian Express App.

  • The Indian Express website has been rated GREEN for its credibility and trustworthiness by Newsguard, a global service that rates news sources for their journalistic standards.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement