scorecardresearch
Monday, Jan 30, 2023
Advertisement
Premium

‘Super-group’ of humpback whales sighted for the first time in Australia

Typically, humpback whales are seen migrating in pods of two to three, or even up to five. A group of this size is extremely rare.

super group whales Australia, super group humpback whales, super group whales, humpback whales Australia, whales Australia, humpback whales, whales, bubble-net feeding, trending videos, trending news, indian express newsHumpback whales feed on the coast off Antarctica and then migrate to North Australia to breed in the winter.

A video of a huge group of humpback whales has been captured on video for what seems to be the very first time. Sighted in Australian waters in 2020, this mass super-group feeding event, where a pod of about 33 whales showcased a unique ‘bubble-net’ feeding behaviour, was shot by a drone pilot.

According to a BBC report, Humpback whales feed on the coast of Antarctica during the summer months and migrate to North Australia to breed in the winter. This cluster was captured off the Sapphire Coast in the southern New South Wales when they were going back to Antarctica. It was the ‘unbelievable’ occurrence that induced scientists to investigate, the report added.

Here, take a look:

Typically, humpback whales are seen migrating in pods of two to three, or even up to five. A group of this size is extremely rare. Previously, a ‘super-group’ was spotted once in the Southern Hemisphere—in South African waters, the website reported.

Subscriber Only Stories
ExplainSpeaking: How to evaluate a Union Budget
Mahesh Vyas writes: Why the job shortage is for real
Delhi confidential: Focus On Projects
Gandhi to Tagore: At old St Stephen’s campus, a glimpse into remnants of ...

“When I first saw the drone footage of these whales popping up in the same shot, I was overwhelmed,” Vanessa Pirotta, wildlife scientist, told the news website. “It was just unbelievable… The pod is bubbling. There are whales coming up, turning on the side, taking breaths. It is a big mash of whales.”

In the clip, which has now gone viral on social media, the whales were seen exhibiting bubble-net feeding behaviour, which is a pattern where whales blow a net of bubbles around their prey to trap the creature. Usually witnessed in the northern hemisphere, scientists are not yet sure how this behaviour arose here.

Experts speculated that the rise in the whale numbers may be due to conservation efforts, triggering the mass feeding event, the report added.

First published on: 09-06-2021 at 23:16 IST
Next Story

Sena urges CM Uddhav not to implement Model Tenancy Act in Maharashtra

Latest Comment
Post Comment
Read Comments
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
close