Here is how a social worker walked for the first time after 14 years of paralysishttps://indianexpress.com/article/trending/trending-globally/here-is-how-a-social-worker-walked-for-the-first-time-after-14-years-of-paralysis-5396252/

Here is how a social worker walked for the first time after 14 years of paralysis

Talking about her first walk after 14-years she called the day 'completely surreal'. "It was so amazing, just being able to do the things that most people take entirely for granted," she told the news website.

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With the use of the exoskeleton, she was able to lift herself up and walk across the room. (Source: Duffer Entertainment/YouTube)

After 14-years of being paralysed, social worker Lucy Dodd was finally able to walk. During her teenage years, young Dodd was struck by a rare congenital malformation of blood vessels, that left her paralysed from the waist below. However, with the help of an £80,000 robotic suit, the wheelchair-bound social worker was able to take her first steps Daily Mail reported.

With the use of the exoskeleton, she was able to lift herself up and walk across the room. A footage of the same was also shared, where the 34-year-old can be seen moving with the help of the bionic contraption, which allows a disabled individual to stand and move. In order to afford the equipment, Dodd is also trying to raise the five-figure amount so that she can move again, the same report stated.

Watch the video here:


Dodd told the news website that she was inspired by Claire Lomas, who completed the London Marathon in 17 days, back in 2012. Being a paraplegic she did so by using the suit. Talking about her first walk after 14-years she called the day ‘completely surreal’. “It was so amazing, just being able to do the things that most people take entirely for granted,” she told the news website.

Dodd developed the mobility problem back in 2002 when she had started her English and Linguistics degree at Lancaster University. A few weeks after her term began, she ‘mysteriously’ started losing control of her left leg, due to which she would often trip over or bump into objects. “At first it was just a bit unusual, but when it didn’t go away after several weeks I knew there wasn’t something right,’ she told the news company.