Google doodles in honour of periodic table creator on his 182nd birthdayhttps://indianexpress.com/article/trending/trending-globally/google-doodles-in-honour-of-periodic-table-creator-on-his-182nd-birthday/

Google doodles in honour of periodic table creator on his 182nd birthday

Dmitri Mendeleev published his version of the periodic table in 1869 with 63 elements. In January 2016, four more were added in the gaps left by him.

The doodle Google released in honour of the periodic table creator Dmitri Mendeleev. (Source: Google)

The name Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev probably wouldn’t ring a bell for many. Does Mendelivium ring a bell? It’s an element with the atomic number 101 in the periodic table, and named after its creator. Dmitri Mendeleev published his version of the periodic table in 1869, with the correct placements of the then known 63 elements. Today, there are 118. If Mendeleev had still been alive, he would have been a proud man, for earlier this year, the seventh row of the periodic table got filled up with the addition of four new elements.

Also see: To honour the filling up of the periodic table’s 7th row, look at here is how the Internet’s found uses for the table beyond chemistry

According to some, the modern structure of the periodic table was visualised by Mendeleev in his dream. “I saw in a dream a table where all elements fell into place as required. Awakening, I immediately wrote it down on a piece of paper, only in one place did a correction later seem necessary,” he has been quoted as saying. While a part of you may wish that dream had never occurred, fact remains that the world would be a much underdeveloped place had it not been for “a chemist of genius, first-class physicist, a fruitful researcher in the fields of hydrodynamics, meteorology, geology, certain branches of chemical technology — explosives, petroleum, and fuels, for example — and other disciplines adjacent to chemistry and physics, a thorough expert of chemical industry and industry in general, and an original thinker in the field of economy,” as science historian Lev Chugaev once described him.

Even a crater on the moon has been named after him. A Google doodle is the least the world could do honour such an accomplished scientist with the kind of scientific legacy he left behind.