Google Doodle honours Max Born, the German Nobel laureatehttps://indianexpress.com/article/trending/trending-globally/google-doodle-honours-max-born-the-german-nobel-laureate-quantum-mechanics-physics-4977069/

Google Doodle honours Max Born, the German Nobel laureate

Google has dedicated beautiful doodle to honour Max Born, a pioneer whose concepts became the basics for narrating the growth story of modern Quantum physics predictions.

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In 1954, Born was awarded with Nobel Prize for the Born Rule, a quantum theory to predict the location of wave particles by the use of mathematical probability (Google Doodle)

From modern day personal computers, lasers, medical imaging devices (MRI), to an array of other significant game-changing inventions, these discoveries have significantly shaped the growth antilogarithm of the technological era of today. Google Doodle today is honouring German physicist Max Born for his contribution to area of Quantum mechanics.

On his 135th birth anniversary, Google has dedicated beautiful doodle to honour Max Born, a pioneer whose concepts became the basics for narrating the growth story of modern Quantum physics predictions.

Born in Breslau on December 11, 1882 to Professor Gustav Born and Margarete, Born from his childhood was an outstanding student. Having completed Ph.D. from Göttingen University, he thereafter became a professor of theoretical physics. As a Professor, he had collaborated with some of the best minds of that time.

During the Nazi uprising, in 1933, Born was forced to emigrate to England where he taught for three years as Stokes Lecturer at Cambridge University. He had also served as a lecturer at Edinburgh University for nearly two decades until his retirement in 1954.

In 1954, Born was awarded with Nobel Prize for the Born Rule, a quantum theory to predict the location of wave particles by the use of mathematical probability. Born rule challenged the previous theories that suggested wave equations were exact measurements that involves cumbersome physical measurement experiments. His theory shows that matrices or “arrays of numbers by rows and columns” could yield a similar result, relying on predictions of probability. The present day’s quantum physics predictions are mainly based on his theory.