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After this video of a bullied kid crying goes viral, support comes from the Avengers to Justin Beiber

As the tearful video of this bullied boy went viral, thousands of people spoke up in his support, including celebrities such as Enrique Iglesias, Justin Beiber, Snoopdog, Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Jennifer Lopez, Dr Phil, among others. Athletes from around his school have offered to be his friend and stop by at his school to meet him.

By: Trends Desk | New Delhi |
Updated: December 12, 2017 9:09:31 pm
bullied kid video, keaton jones, bullying, anti-bullying, chris evan, justin bieber, keaton jones crying video, athletes keaton jones, keato jones gifts, indian express, world news Keaton Jones’ mother posted a video of him on Facebook in which the little boy describes how he is bullied in school. Ever since the video went viral, many celebrities have reached out to him in support. (Source: Everything TN, Jarrett Guarantano/ Twitter)

Bullying in both the virtual and real world is quite traumatic, especially for kids, often reducing them to tears or prompting them to take even more serious actions. Well, a video of a tearful boy, Keaton Jones, from Knoxville, Tennessee, US, talking about being bullied in his school has gone viral just because it’s touched a pulse with so many people. The heartbreaking video has garnered an overwhelming response from people all over the world, including celebrities, who have extended their support to him and have taken a stand to say ‘No’ against bullying.

In the video, young Keaton tearfully asks why must people bully. His mother Kimberley posted the video on her Facebook page on December 8, shortly after 12.30 pm. She said, she had just picked her son from school again because he was too afraid of his bullies. “For the record, Keaton asked to do this AFTER he had me pick him up AGAIN because he was afraid to go to lunch,” Jones wrote in her Facebook post that has now been made private.

In a heart-wrenching video, young Keaton described how the students throw “milk on him” during recess and called him “ugly” because of his nose. Asking why people get bullied, he said, “It’s not OK! People that are different don’t need to be criticised about it. It’s not their fault.”

Watch the video here:

With hashtag #IStandWithKeaton trending on the Internet, the video has not only urged people to discuss bullying but there are also those who are raising money for the kid and have pledged their support to fight bullying.

The video since then has got over 22 million views at the time of writing, and has been shared by stars like Enrique Iglesias, Justin Beiber, Snoopdog, Chris Evans, among others. While Beiber lauded Keaton for his “compassion”, Evans invited him for the Avengers — Infinity Wars premiere in Los Angeles. Here’s what many of them had to say:

It didn’t take long before the sports world took notice of his plight, sadly something that is quite common in middle and high school. While almost all Tennesse basketball and football teams invited him to their games, others have promised to visit him in school during lunch so that he is not afraid anymore. As he cried in the video saying he had no friends in school, thousands around the country, including celebrities, have assured him they are his friends. Check these tweets out:

Keaton Jones has now become an Internet sensation of sorts, thanks to the overwhelming and heartwarming support he has received through social media. Amid all the trolling, such stories of positive action triggered by Netizens are what keep one’s faith in humanity. Here’s hoping this can be an example for all those scared of bullies that they’re not alone, and neither should they take bullying lying down.

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