Just Rs 999: 1-year pack + offers

Journalism of Courage
Advertisement

Happy with Thybolt performance, Dhruva Space now aims for larger satellites

“Thybolt 1 and Thybolt 2 are two amateur radio communication nanosatellites. They weigh roughly 700 grams and are the size of tiffin containers,” explained Chief Technology Officer Abhay Egoor.

(From left) Abhay Egoor, Krishna Teja Penamakuru, Chaitanya Dora, and Sanjay Nekkanti.

After successfully launching the Thybolt 1 and Thybolt 2 amateur radio communication nanosatellites, Hyderabad-based space tech start-up Dhruva Space is now preparing for larger deployments in the coming months.

“Thybolt 1 and Thybolt 2 are two amateur radio communication nanosatellites. They weigh roughly 700 grams and are the size of tiffin containers,” explained Chief Technology Officer Abhay Egoor.

Launched by ISRO’s PSLV-C54 on November 26, the indigenously developed 0.5-U satellites are now in low-earth orbit. The first signals from the private nanosatellites were recorded over Hyderabad on the night of November 26.

Dhruva Space is a full-stack space technology company that ensures a satellite is launched and put in the intended orbit. They also operate and monitor the satellite after this. “In the Thybolt 1 and 2 missions, the company has done a full stack,” said CEO Sanjay Nekkanti, adding that both are based on the P DoT platform of Dhruva Space.


“The P DoT is a picosatellite platform (weighing 1–24 kg). It generates power using a body-mounted solar panel. It also has a control system that ensures that once the satellite is in orbit, the satellite solar panels are pointing towards the sun and the antennas are pointing towards the ground,” said Nekkanti. “The communication system, the power system, the control system, the satellite software, and the antenna deployment mechanism all have been built by Dhruva Space.”

These radio communication nanosatellites will “provide access to the amateur radio community worldwide”.

The two Thybolt satellites also send their health parameters in the form of morse code and can be received by any individual. “These satellites can also be utilised for some sort of messaging through the Store and Forward messaging facility.”


Nekkanti elaborated: “Suppose the satellite is passing over Hyderabad; it can pick up a byte, and it will store the byte. Now, say the satellite revolves around the earth and comes over Delhi, the message can be relayed to a ham radio operator there.”

The company plans to launch the P30 nanosatellite — weighing 1 to 30 kg — sometime between June and December next year. “The P30 platform can be used for different sorts of applications. The platform can be used to study the weather and image the planet. It can also be used for interplanetary missions and for studying the different atmospheres of different planets,” said Nekkanti. “The final platform is P90 with satellites weighing up to 300 kg.”
The four co-founders — the other two are Chief Operating Officer Krishna Teja and Chief Financial Officer Chaitanya Dora Surapureddy — have known each other for over a decade. Chaitanya, Abhay, and Krishna completed their bachelor’s degrees in engineering from BITS Pilani (Goa) while Nekkanti graduated from SRM University with a bachelor’s degree in electronics and telecommunications.

Subscriber Only Stories
Advertisement

Mumbai Angel Network, Indian Angel Network, Indian Angel Network Fund, and Blue Ashva Capital have invested in the company so far.

First published on: 29-11-2022 at 19:06 IST
Next Story

Karan Singh Grover and Akshay Oberoi join the cast of Hrithik Roshan-Deepika Padukone’s Fighter, see photo

Home
ePaper
Next Story
close
X