Apple’s T2 security chip could block third-party repairs for newer Macs: Reporthttps://indianexpress.com/article/technology/laptops/apples-t2-security-chip-could-block-third-party-repairs-for-newer-macs-5445426/

Apple’s T2 security chip could block third-party repairs for newer Macs: Report

Apple's new T2 security chip will likely block third-party repairs for the new Macs thanks to newer  protocols set in place

Apple, Apple MacBook, Apple MacBook repair, MacBook repairs, MacBook T2 chip, MacBook T2 security chip, MacBook Air T2 security chip
Apple’s MacBook Air at the launch event. Apple has admitted that the newer Macs with T2 security chip could get blocked if users rely on unauthorised or third-party repairs. (Source: AP)

Apple’s T2 security chip will likely block third-party repairs for the new Macs thanks to newer protocols set in place, according to a report in The Verge. Apple recently showcased the new MacBook Air and Mac Mini, both of which come with the new T2 security as well.

The T2 security chip is a Secure Enclave co-processor, which provides the foundation for the APFS encrypted storage, secure boot, and Touch ID on Macs, according to Apple’s own whitepaper. APFS is Apple’s own proprietary file system for Macs.

Earlier iFixit CEO Kyle Wiens had told The Verge, that the T2 security chip is like a “a guillotine” that Apple is holding over its consumers. This is because after repair, T2 security chip now checks whether these are from an authorized source and carries out a post-repair reboot. Basically if a Mac is fixed or has parts replaced from an non-authorized source or non-Apple repair, the Mac could be rendered inoperable because the T2 would be running some checks on it.

Apple has also confirmed the same to The Verge that in case of repairs of parts like logic board or Touch ID,  the T2 will run checks for select replacement parts and whether they are from an authorized source or not.

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If this does not happen, the Mac will remain ‘inoperative’.  Apple did not give a list of repairs which required this test to be run.

Read more: Apple MacBook Air 2018 first impressions: A classic redefined 

Earlier 9to5Mac had reported about a repair document that was shared with authorised Apple service provides, which also highlighted something similar. The document read, “For Macs with the Apple T2 chip, the repair process is not complete for certain parts replacements until the AST 2 System Configuration suite has been run. Failure to perform this step will result in an inoperative system and an incomplete repair.”

Overall, the latest step is being seen as one that will further restrict third-party repairs for Macs. Also for those who like to fix their devices themselves, the newer Macs will pose a problem. Apple’s iMac Pro, Mac mini models from 2018, MacBook Air (2018) and new MacBook Pro models from 2018 all come with the T2 security chip.