Teewe 2 can play web videos, files stored in laptop on TV

Mango Man has launched Teewe 2, the second version of its content streaming dongle, exclusively on Amazon.in at Rs 2,399.

Written by Nandagopal Rajan | New Delhi | Updated: May 20, 2015 7:26:39 am
Chromecast, Teewe 2, dongle, streaming dongle, Chromecast Amazon, teewe Amazon.in, technology news Mango Man has launched Teewe 2, the second version of its content streaming dongle, exclusively on Amazon.in at Rs 2,399.

There is another option now for those who want to stream web videos on larger screens.

Bangalore-based Mango Man has launched Teewe 2, the second version of its content streaming dongle, exclusively on Amazon.in at Rs 2,399. The price of the Chromecast lookalike will include two months of free 20GB content for Airtel broadband users as well as access to premium ErosNow content.

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The dongle will also be able to connect to and play content from laptops and other computers at home using dedicated software. It will also support streaming on Windows Phone devices, which is rare at the moment.

Other new features include an improved Wi-Fi chip that can play content even on poor networks, a detachable power adapter and cable for quad core GPU for smooth streaming with enhanced performance. Users will be able to control their content using the app.

Teewe 2 is powered by a a dual-core ARM Cortex A9 Processor along with a quad-core GPU and 1GB of DDR 3 RAM. It will work with any TV with an HDMI Port and needs a Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n connection to stream online content.

Mango Man was incorporated in 2013 with the idea of reimagining the television. “We initially started off on creating a much better set-top-box. But we realised it is not the best solution and has to rely on the remote which is not the best way to interact with content,” explains CEO and founder Sai Srinivas.

Srinivas is convinced that the smart television is a flawed concept and people will be looking at the television only as a display device. “Smart TVs are fragmented and it is going to be tough to maintain so many ecosystems. Also, you need a remote to interact with these televisions and that is not a good optiion,” he adds.

“We are focussed on Indian content. Our next streams will be regional and content for children,” Srinivas says, adding that the idea is to have use cases for everyone in the house.

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