Google Glass to help autistic kids with social interactionshttps://indianexpress.com/article/technology/gadgets/google-glass-to-help-autistic-kids-with-social-interactions-5290445/

Google Glass to help autistic kids with social interactions

The Superpower Glass System software that runs on Google Glass and Android smartphone, to help autistic children with social interactions.

Google Glass, autism spectrum disorder, ASD, Google Glass autism, autism treatment, Superpower Glass System, machine learning
The Superpower Glass System software that runs on Google Glass and Android smartphone, to help autistic children with social interactions.

Scientists have developed Superpower Glass System, a software that runs on Google Glass and Android smartphone, to help autistic children with social interactions. As per a report published in journal npj Digital Medicine, the pilot research the prototype of the software was used to increase social skills, facial affect recognition, as well as eye contact for children with autism between the ages of three and 17. The Superpower Glass System takes advantage of machine learning.

According to Science News, the pilot research was conducted on 14 children with autism spectrum disorder. Under this program, 14 children used the software at home for a little over 10 weeks. “After treatment, the kids showed improved social skills, including increased eye contact and ability to decode facial expressions,” the report reads.

Google Glass with facial recognition software needs to be worn by children with autism. The device identifies natural emotions as they interact with others and notifies people of the expression with the help of emoticons on Glass’ display or audio. The smartphone app or processes sensor helps track faces, recognise actions and identify social cues.

This is not the first time that scientists used Google Glass to help children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in social interactions. Last year, researchers at University of Toronto in Canada developed a software for a wearable system that helps coach children with autism spectrum disorder in everyday interactions.

The app named Holli listens to conversations and prompts the user with an appropriate reply. For instance, Holli will suggest responses, such as ‘Hey’, ‘Hello’ or ‘Afternoon’ if the user is greeted by a person who says ‘Welcome’.