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Roger Federer announces retirement: Laver Cup next month will be my final ATP tour event

Roger Federer said, "Tennis has treated me generously more than I ever would have dreamt and I must recognise when I have to end my competitive career."

Roger Federer announced his retirement by penning a heartfelt note on Twitter.

Roger Federer, a 20 Grand Slam single titles winner and one of the greatest tennis players, has announced his retirement from the game, saying next week’s Laver Cup will be his final ATP tournament. “Laver Cup next month will be my final ATP tour event. I will not play any more Grand Slams or in the tour,” Roger Federer said.

“I have worked hard to return to full competitive form. But I also know my body’s capacity and limit. I am 41 years old and have played more than 1500 matches over 24 years. Tennis has treated me generously more than I ever would have dreamt and I must recognise when I have to end my competitive career. I will play more tennis, of course, but not in Grand Slams and in tour. It’s a bitter-sweet decision,” he said.

“I will miss everything the tour has given me. But at the same time, there is so much to celebrate. I consider myself one of the most fortunate people on Earth. I was given a special talent to play tennis, and I did it at a level that I never imagined, for much longer than I ever thought possible,” he added in his Twitter post.

Federer, who dominated men’s tennis after winning his first Grand Slam title at Wimbledon in 2003, has been troubled by injuries in recent years. He has undergone three knee operations in the last two years and his last competitive match was a quarter-final defeat against Poland’s Hubert Hurkacz at the 2021 Wimbledon.

Federer had announced he planned to return to the tour when he teams up with long-time rival and friend Rafa Nadal to play doubles at the Laver Cup in London.

He had also planned to play at the Swiss indoors tournament at home in Basel. Federer first served notice of his special talent when he beat American great Pete Sampras on his way to the quarter-finals at Wimbledon in 2001. Two years later he outclassed Mark Philippoussis on Wimbledon’s Centre Court to begin his Grand Slam collection.

Federer went on to win seven more Wimbledon titles, claimed five U.S. Open titles, six Australian crowns and a single French Open achieved in 2009 to complete his career Slam.

He also holds the record for 237 consecutive weeks as world number one and the only omission from his glittering CV is an Olympic singles gold medal, losing to Andy Murray in the 2012 final.

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(With Reuters inputs)

First published on: 15-09-2022 at 07:02:24 pm
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