IPL 2019: ‘He ain’t winning any spirit of cricket awards’ Jos Buttler’s controversial run out by R Ashwin draws polarised reactionshttps://indianexpress.com/article/sports/ipl/ipl-2019-rr-vs-kxip-ashwin-buttler-run-out-mankad-reactions-5642551/

IPL 2019: ‘He ain’t winning any spirit of cricket awards’ Jos Buttler’s controversial run out by R Ashwin draws polarised reactions

R Ashwin's controversial run out of Jos Buttler has drawn polarised responses. Buttler was driving Rajasthan Royals' chase and after his dismissal, his team lost their way and ended being beaten by 14 runs.

Jos Buttler’s run out at the hands of R Ashwin has polarised the cricketing world. (IPL website)

Rajasthan Royals’ Jos Buttler was left fuming when he was Mankaded by Kings XI Punjab captain Ravichandran Ashwin in an IPL match at Jaipur. Buttler was on 69 off 43 balls with 10 fours and two sixes in his kitty when Ashwin run him out in the 13th over. It meant that the entry of Steve Smith, whose return was the big headline of the day, ended up being overshadowed by the events that preceded it. RR were cruising when Buttler was in the middle and collapsed after he was dismissed. They eventually lost the match by 14 runs. 

An incident like this always draws strong reactions. Moreover, this has happened in a tournament that is often one of the most watched events of the cricketing calendar. Naturally, big names in cricket chipped in with their opinions and they were polarised, to say the least.

The term ‘Mankading’ is derived from the name of legendary former Indian cricketer Vinoo Mankad. In 1947, during a series in Australia, Mankad had dismissed opposition batsman Bill Brown twice by clipping the bails at the non-striker’s end before bowling he ball. The act has since been termed as Mankading. While Mankad was roundly criticised for it he received support from an unlikely source – batting great and then Australian captain Don Bradman.

In his autobiography, Bradman wrote: “For the life of me, I can’t understand why [the press] questioned his sportsmanship. The laws of cricket make it quite clear that the non-striker must keep within his ground until the ball has been delivered. If not, why is the provision there which enables the bowler to run him out? By backing up too far or too early, the non-striker is very obviously gaining an unfair advantage.”