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Even if the DRS is around, those decisions won’t go in our favour: MS Dhoni

Dhoni also said that umpiring in the series in the first two Tests could have been better.

By: Press Trust of India | Brisbane |
Updated: December 20, 2014 6:53:21 pm
MS-Dhoni_m Dhoni defended not having the DRS in the series. (Source: AP)

Indian cricket captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni feels 50-50 decisions are going against his team in the ongoing Test series against Australia but remains adamant that having the controversial Decision Review System would not have helped.

India, now 0-2 behind in the four-match series after losing the second Test today, were hard done when R Ashwin was given caught behind off Mitchell Starc this morning during a stunning batting collapse.

But despite claiming to be at the receiving end of some hard decisions, Dhoni defended not having the DRS in the series.

“There’s a lot of 50-50 decisions that are not going in our favour. We’re on the receiving end more often than not.

What happens in DRS, even if the DRS is around, those (contentious) decisions won’t go in our favour,” he said.

“DRS is used often to justify the decision that’s given by the umpire. What’s important is to use DRS as a way of giving the right decision irrespective of if the umpire has given it out or not out.

“There are a lot of ways to use DRS. This is something that needs to be put in a specific way. You’re adding too many variables to the game,” he added.

Dhoni said umpiring in the series, which has been done by South African Marais Erasmus and England’s Ian Gould in the first two Tests, can be better.

“It can improve. There have been quite a few 50-50 calls where we have been on the receiving end,” he said.

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