England were like rabbits in the headlights against New Zealand: Trevor Baylisshttps://indianexpress.com/article/sports/cricket/england-were-like-rabbits-in-the-headlights-against-new-zealand-trevor-bayliss-5107585/

England were like rabbits in the headlights against New Zealand: Trevor Bayliss

England coach Trevor Bayliss lambasted his players after they were dismissed for 58 by New Zealand on day one of the first Test at Auckland.

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England were dismissed for 58 by New Zealand on day one of the first Test at Auckland.

England coach Trevor Bayliss lambasted his players by describing them as “rabbits in headlights” after they were dismissed for 58 by New Zealand on day one of the first Test at Auckland. Left-arm seamer Trent Boult along with new-ball partner Tim Southee rocked the Three Lions batting order reducing them to 27/9 before Craig Overton hit a vital 33 to save England the blushes. England could only muster 58 in the first innings. Incidentally, this was also England’s lowest total against New Zealand in Test cricket.

Reflecting on the abysmal display, a disappointed Trevor Bayliss spoke to Sky Sports and said, “We certainly did not bat very well this morning. They bowled extremely well but we batted extremely poorly. I think it must have been a mental thing, our feet looked like they had lead in them. We didn’t make too many right decision with our footwork. We got caught behind the crease to fairly full balls, which allows the ball to swing and then we were nowhere. It looked a little bit like we were rabbits in the headlights.”

Recalling practice match and whether it helped to get accustomed to the conditions, Bayliss said, “Those practice games are always a bit difficult sometimes. It doesn’t matter how hard you try and play the game, there is always that lack of intensity there. It is very difficult to copy the intensity of a Test match. First match we were very rusty, second match we played a lot better.”

“When one person sneezes it seems that we all catch a cold. It’s not good enough. I don’t feel anger, more disappointment. We have to take it on the chin, sit down and work out what we can do better before the next innings,” he was quoted saying by The Guardian.