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‘Tonight is about another bowling hero’: Ashwin, Sehwag, Hales back Deepti Sharma’s run out of Charlie Dean

The cricket world is divided after India secured a thrilling 16-run victory over England at Lord’s after Deepti Sharma's ran out England’s Charlie Dean in the 44th over at the non-striker’s end.

Deepti Sharma Mankad, Mankading, IND vs ENG, ENG vs INDIndia's Deepti Sharma runs out England's Charlie Dean to win the third women's one day international match at Lord's, London. (AP)

Deepti Sharma‘s running out of England’s Charlotte at Lord’s triggered boos and is a talking point across the cricketing world but it’s a debate that has raged since the original incident in 1947, when Indian great Vinoo Mankad twice ran out Bill Brown at the bowler’s end during India’s tour of Australia.

Cricket’s most infamous debate is back after Indian spinner Deepti Sharma ran out England’s Charlie Dean in the 44th over at the non-striker’s end. India women inflicted on England women a first one-day international whitewash in 20 years on Saturday, which was also the farewell game for India veteran Jhulan Goswami. It was India’s first ODI whitewash against England since 2002, when Goswami made her international debut.

Deepti Sharma was into her delivery stride when she caught England batter, Charlie Dean, backing up too far and whipped the bails off.

Dean was dumbstruck and threw her bat to the ground in tears. Her England teammates looked on with shaking heads, and the run out was confirmed by the umpires to end the match. India won by 16 runs and Dean was out for a team-best 47.


It has created quite an uproar and has left the cricketing world divided.

“It just doesn‘t feel like the right way to win a game,” former England batter Lydia Greenway told Sky Sports.

While former England captain Nasser Hussain called it ‘controversial’ on air.

England captain Amy Jones at the post-match presentation, said: “The last dismissal divides opinion. I’m not a fan but it depends how India feel about it. It’s within the rules, hopefully, doesn’t take the shine off the summer.”


Meanwhile, India skipper Harmanpreet Kaur back Deepti Sharma and said:”I will back my players, she hasn’t done something outside the rules.”

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England all-rounder Georgia Elwiss on the BBC Test Match Special said: “I cannot believe the Indian team felt that was the only way they were going to get a wicket. I don’t think Charlie Dean was trying to gain any sort of advantage. It’s ridiculous. It’s taken the shine off Jhulan Goswami’s big send-off. She’s doing the lap of honour but everyone else in the ground is just stunned at how it’s finished.”

R Ashwin, who had dismissed England batter Jos Buttler, in a IPL game in 2019, has backed Deepti Sharma. He tweeted: Why the hell are you trending, Ashwin? Tonight is about another bowling hero @Deepti_Sharma06.”

Former India batter Virender Sehwag, too, lamented former England cricketers, who have shown their angst towards Deepti.


“Funny to see so many English guys being poor losers. #Runout,” Sehwag wrote on Twitter.


Former India opener Wasim Jaffer said: “It’s actually quite simple. Ball comes into play when bowler starts run up. From that moment on as a batter or non striker you’ve to keep your eyes on the ball, if you’re a bit careless, opposition will get you out. And you can get out at either ends.”

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However, several cricket fans, including the legendary James Anderson, Stuart Broad accused Sharma of having no intention of actually bowling the ball, bringing the ‘Spirit of Cricket’ into question.


England paceman Stuart Broad called it a “terrible way” to win a cricket match, while British television personality Pierse Morgan tweeted: “Absolutely pathetic way to ‘win’ a cricket match. The whole India team should be ashamed of themselves.”

England wicketkeeper Sam Billings posted: “There’s surely not a person who has played the game that thinks this is acceptable? Just not cricket …

“Well within the laws but not in the spirit. Just my opinion … the law should be changed back to a warning system or penalty runs for excessive backing up.”

England opener Alex Hales replied to Billings tweet by saying: “It shouldn’t be difficult for the non striker to stay in their crease til the ball has left the hand.”

“The ball didn’t leave the hand though.. I’m not talking necessarily about this incident, but just the ‘mankad’ issue in general. It wouldn’t be an issue if batters simply remained in the crease until the ball has left the hand,” Hales said in his other tweet.

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Former England batter James Taylor posted: “What an average way to win a game! Yes it’s officially in the rules! But poor when the batsman wasn’t trying to gain an advantage! She was just walking in with the bowler and when the bowler should’ve released the ball she was still in her crease! Really poor.”

Former England spinner Alex Hartley told BBC Test Match Special: “I don‘t really know how I feel about it because I don’t think it’s in the spirit of the game.

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“I can‘t believe it’s happened but I can believe it’s happened, and that it is Deepti Sharma.

“She always, always threatens to do it so as a team you‘ll talk about it. England have got a lot closer than India would have expected and she’s actually done it. I just don‘t think that’s how you should finish an international game. England are going to be absolutely seething.”

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Kate Cross, who took 4-26 in the match, said she wouldn’t have done a Mankad and played down any anger in the England dressing room.

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“It’s a dismissal that’s always going to divide opinion. Some people are going to like it and some people aren’t,” Cross said. “Deepti chose to dismiss Charlie that way. I’m more disappointed for Charlie that she couldn’t get 50 at Lord’s today because she looked set to do that. Maybe that’s the only way to get Deano out today.”

First published on: 25-09-2022 at 10:08:02 am
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