6 developmental activities for babieshttps://indianexpress.com/article/parenting/family/developmental-activities-for-babies-6104454/

6 developmental activities for babies

Once your baby is at least a few months old, you can begin to tell stories as part of the bedtime routine. Make your baby sit on your lap and keep a children's picture book in front. Point out the illustrations to your baby and allow him to touch the book or flip a page.

developmental activities for babies
Play games with your baby to help them achieve developmental milestones.

As your baby grows older and is gradually able to make sense of things, you can start involving your little one in games and activities to help them reach developmental milestones. These activities will improve your child’s muscle strength and motor skills. Try these six developmental activities, each of which will boost your child’s development.

1. Floor play

This activity aims to get the baby to move around on his own, building muscle strength in the arms, neck, back and shoulders. This will eventually help the baby learn to roll, sit and walk as he or she grows up. Sit on a soft blanket or carpet and place your baby on it. Spread some toys around and encourage the little one to reach out to them.

2. Follow objects

This will help in improving your child’s eye movement. Lay your baby on your back and hold a toy or object in front to catch your child’s attention. Keep moving the object from side to side slowly and see if your baby’s eyes follow the movement. Your child may get distracted, so try to grab his or her attention once again.

3. Listening to music

Soft, melodious music soothes babies. Observe your baby once you play music. If your baby tries to move, hold him and do so in rhythm. Play music at intervals and not all day long or your child may not pay attention after a point.

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4. Treasure chest

Fill a box with some of your child’s toys. Bring the baby close to the box and encourage him to check them out and possibly also pick and hold them. This will teach your child basic skills of holding, pulling, pushing and releasing with their hands, strengthening their muscles.

5. Storytelling

Once your baby is at least a few months old, you can begin to tell stories as part of the bedtime routine. Put your baby on your lap and keep a children’s picture book in front. Point out the illustrations and allow him to touch the book or flip a page. Storytelling from early childhood boosts language, visual and cognitive skills.

6. Track the sound

Bring a rattle close to your baby. Make it rattle and then hide it as your baby looks at you. Keep repeating this and see if your baby is able to track the sound. This will help improve his or her sense of hearing.