What Anand Mahindra learnt from a schoolgirl shows how kids can also teach parentshttps://indianexpress.com/article/parenting/family/anand-mahindra-social-media-letter-kids-teach-parents-5660596/

What Anand Mahindra learnt from a schoolgirl shows how kids can also teach parents

Mahindra shared a photo of the letter by 11-year-old Mahika Mishra on social media, in which she appeals to him to devise a plan for reducing honking on the streets.

anand mahindra parenting, listening to kids
Anand Mahindra shared a letter by a girl from Mumbai on social media. (Source: anandmahindra/Twitter)

It is not just parents and teachers who give lessons to kids; sometimes the little ones can inspire adults too. That’s what happened with business tycoon Anand Mahindra recently after a Mumbai schoolgirl wrote a letter to him.

Mahindra shared a photo of the letter by 11-year-old Mahika Mishra on social media, in which she appeals to him to devise a a plan for reducing honking on the streets.

“I go on many drives and I have noticed that many people honk unnecessarily–especially in traffic. They do not understand that honking does not make the vehicle move,” Mishra wrote in her letter. She also went on to ask Mahindra to design a horn for his company’s cars that could honk only five times in 10 minutes, each honk lasting not more than three seconds, to minimise noise pollution.

 

Kids are not just naive beings today. With greater exposure to the outside world, thanks to technology along with the guidance of their parents and teachers, they are more responsible and aware of their surroundings.

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One is reminded of how three kids, aged between two and four years, reportedly filed a plea in 2017 to ban firecrackers in Delhi, explaining how children are affected by air pollution. The following year, hundreds of childeen marched the streets of the city for the same. Think of Greta Thunberg, on the other hand, a ninth grade Swedish girl, who has been nominated for Nobel Peace Prize for her contributions towards raising awareness about climate change.

Instead of considering themselves to be know-it-all, parents and teachers need to be open to thoughts and ideas put forward by a child. And they don’t have to be revolutionary each time. For instance, what Gunjan Kochhar, yoga trainer and a mother, learnt from her son a year ago has stayed with her ever since. “One of the days I was overwhelmed. My son, who was 15 then, told me, ‘Mom stop pleasing us all. Take care of yourself first and you don’t have to do everything we ask for; you can always say no, especially when I ask for some food late at night, please feel free to say no. Keep yourself happy’,” she told Express Parenting.

A lot of parents will at least agree on how they have learnt more about technology from kids. “The younger generation is a lot more tech savvy than we are. We are dependent on them on some level to learn new things,” Dr Rachna Khanna Singh, HOD-Holistic Medicine & Psychology, Artemis Hospital, said.

In Rachna’s case, her daughter Aveka, Vice Captain of the junior football team in India, inspires in her a sense of determination and discipline as well. “Whether it is raining, hot or cold, each day my daughter would leave early in the morning to play. At times, I might even ask her to skip but she says, ‘I have a goal and I need to reach there’. This discipline is something that she has re-ingrained in me again and again,” the mother added.

Nobody is questioning a parent’s experiential knowledge. The idea is to not discard your child’s opinion without listening to it properly. Children can sensitise parents too.