This new toy is making children yell and parents aren’t happyhttps://indianexpress.com/article/parenting/events-things-to-do/new-toy-yellies-children-yell-parents-reaction-5493898/

This new toy is making children yell and parents aren’t happy

Yellies are toy spiders that function when you yell at them. Some parents, however, are not quite pleased with the concept.

yellies toy
Yellies or toy spiders have received mixed reactions from parents. (Source: Amazon)

Called Yellies, a new toy collection has grabbed parents’ attention but not for the right reasons. That’s because these new toy spiders require children to yell at them to function. And you thought only parents yelled at their child to get them to react?

“The louder you yell, the faster they go,” reads the official website of the toy company Hasbro.

Designed for children aged five and up, the toy spider basically responds to sound and moves according to the noise level. One can clap, play music or even sing for the Yellies to respond. Only the sound has to be loud enough for the spider to move.

Ever since the toy hit the market, parents have taken to social media to express their discontent, with many criticising it.

Hilary Hard, a mother from Alabama, for instance, shared on social media her experience of making her child play with the toy, who kept screaming and cried. “10 years from now we’ll be discussing this in therapy,” she wrote.

Many parents have been curious about what made the toy company come up with such an idea, while condemning it. Here’s how netizens responded:

 

 

 

Jasraman Grewal, father to a seven-year-old boy, told Express Parenting: “I think it’s perfect for children because it’s so unpredictably interactive. Children really love interactive toys, and I am quite surprised by how smartly it has been designed. I really think it will make a great gift where large numbers of children are involved. Though it seems like it may bring the house down.”

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Another parent said, “There might be many such toys, which may be exasperating, but they are at least better than increased exposure to screen time.”