Watch: How a grieving mom created a video game on cancerhttps://indianexpress.com/article/parenting/events-things-to-do/how-grieving-mom-created-video-game-on-cancer-5672804/

Watch: How a grieving mom created a video game on cancer

The mother of three, along with her husband, decided to take her two other sons on the journey with a story of a brave knight fighting a dragon called cancer.

cancer, mother, child
Representative image (Source: Getty Images)

Cancer is serious business, but for this family, a video game helped them cope with their grief, when the youngest child Joel was diagnosed by aggressive brain tumour. Amy Green, video game designer shares, “Perhaps you’re even thinking like so many people before you: cancer is not a game. Well, tell that to any pediatric cancer parent that’s ever taken an exam glove and blown it up into a balloon, or transformed a syringe into a rocket ship, or let their child ride their IV pole through the hospital halls like it was a race car. Because when you have children, everything is a game…While cancer can steal many things from a family, it shouldn’t steal play.”

The mother of three, along with her husband, decided to take her two other sons on the journey with a story of a brave knight fighting a dragon called cancer. “Every night, I told them more of the story, but I never let the story end. I was just building up a context that they could understand and hoping that our prayers would be answered and I would never have to tell them that that knight, who had fought so bravely, was done fighting and could rest now, forever.”

Playing the game makes one witness to Joel’s life and his struggles, before he succumbed to cancer. Says Green, “On the night when “That Dragon, Cancer” won the Game for Impact Award, we cheered, we smiled and we talked about Joel and the impact he had on our life — on all of those hard and hopeful nights that we shared with him when he changed our hearts and taught us so much more about life and love and faith and purpose. That award will never mean as much to me as even a single photograph of my son, but it does represent all of the people who his life has impacted, people I’ll never meet.”

Watch the video here: