US hunter pays $110,000 to kill Pakistan’s national animal markhorhttps://indianexpress.com/article/pakistan/us-hunter-pays-whopping-110000-usd-to-kill-pakistans-national-animal-5571818/

US hunter pays $110,000 to kill Pakistan’s national animal markhor

Markhor, a distinctive species of wild goat identified by its long hair and spiralled horns, is the national animal of Pakistan. It is a protected species in Pakistan unless permitted by the government to kill it under trophy hunting programmes.

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The hunter, Bryan Kinsel Harlan, hunted the markhor from Sassi-Harmosh community conservation area after paying the said fee to acquire the hunting permit. (Image Courtesy: Dawn.com)

A US hunter paid a whopping 110,000 USD to kill a flared-horned markhor, a rare wildlife species in Pakistan, during a trophy hunting season in the country’s northern Gilgit-Baltistan region, Dawn reported.

Markhor, Pakistan’s national animal, is a distinctive species of wild goat identified by its long hair and spiralled horns. It is a protected species in Pakistan unless permitted by the government to kill it under trophy hunting programmes.

The hunter, Bryan Kinsel Harlan, hunted the markhor from Sassi-Harmosh community conservation area after paying the said fee to acquire the hunting permit, Dawn quoted the Gilgit-Baltistan wildlife department as saying. This is the highest permit fee ever offered in the country.

“It was an easy and close shot and I am pleased to take this trophy,” Dawn quoted the US hunter as saying. The foreign hunter managed to hunt a 41-inch markhor trophy, which is considered a good-sized trophy.

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In the 2018-19 trophy hunting season, about 50 wildlife animals have been hunted by foreign and national hunters. In January, two US nationals had hunted the highest-rated Astore Markhor over 100,000 USD.

Authorities hand over 80 per cent of the permit money to the respective local communities, while the remaining goes to the government exchequer. The local people now work to protect the animal instead of killing.

Markhor is listed as a near threatened species in the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List. It has a worldwide population of 5,754 and is found in Afghanistan, India (Jammu-Kashmir), Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.