Letters to the editor: A betrayalhttps://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/letters-to-editor/letters-to-the-editor-a-betrayal/

Letters to the editor: A betrayal

Additionally, they are doing irreparable harm to India’s global image.

APROPOS the editorial, ‘Not heard in Bangalore’ (IE, April 6), the BJP should have honestly deliberated on the issues currently plaguing the nation and the party. In particular, it should have sent out a strong message to the communal elements in its fold. These antisocial and anti-national elements are queering the pitch for growth and development. Additionally, they are doing irreparable harm to India’s global image. It is one thing to project the image of a strong party that is united behind the vision of a Congress-mukt Bharat — that’s just politics. But it is entirely another to cloud your mandate with an agenda that is divisive and detrimental to India. That’s a betrayal of the voter who brought the BJP in on the plank of development.— Aatish Sharma, Mohali

Bad Friday

This refers to ‘SC judge Kurian Joseph says he is deeply hurt over CJI’s decision to hold conference on Good Friday’ (IE, April 4). Justice Kurian Joseph’s resentment is understandable. Equal importance must be given to the revered festivals of all religions. If we treat Diwali and Holi as sacrosanct holidays, then we must respect other faiths and their festivals in equal measure. Justice Joseph’s stance on the issue is commendable. He is right to have felt miffed for being made to work on Good Friday. In future, government conferences must not be held on festival days.— Gurjant Pannu, Chandigarh

Thinking wild

This refers to ‘A greenprint for reform’ by Valmik Thapar (IE, April 6). The writer’s contribution to the national discourse is highly relevant. Thapar has worked on conservation for decades and rightly points out that our forests and wildlife need to be governed by the best possible talent and keeping in mind international best practice. Our forests and wildlife are among our most important resources and a source of national pride. For far too long, we have neglected them and only paid them lip service.— Nigam Pandya, Daman

Checking the balance

The prime minister’s exhortation to the judiciary to evolve an internal mechanism for self-assessment and the chief justice’s remark that the executive and the judiciary were siblings and should work together could go a long way in clearing the air between these two arms of the state. Whereas the executive needs to understand that the judiciary is the last resort for aggrieved citizens suffering at the hands of the government, the judiciary needs to realise that it also needs an oversight mechanism to ensure that it does not transgress its limits.— Nivedita Dwivedi, Mumbai