Letters to the Editor: Alphabet souphttps://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/editorials/letters-to-the-editor-alphabet-soup/

Letters to the Editor: Alphabet soup

A new board should be formed for film certification, which simply divides movies into three categories.

This refers to the editorial ‘Cut it out’ (IE, August 22). One wonders whether it makes any sense for the Central Board of Film Certification to continue in these days of unrestrained internet access. The CBFC’s brand of “certification” has become synonymous with censorship. The editorial suggested an alternative body that is equidistant from industry and government. But in this era of a free-flowing information, the taxonomy of “A”, “U/A” and “U” films is bizarre. It all boils down to whether a film is worth watching or not. And a government body need not tell me that.

— J.P. George (Pune)

The Central Board of Film Certification needs to be reformed. The board is functioning like a watchman. It is, frankly, not capable of critically appreciating and appraising films and their artistic merit. The government must not have any right to ban or edit the content of a movie. This is the right of the filmmaker alone. A new board should be formed for film certification, which simply divides movies into three categories: those that are fit to be viewed by children, those that are fit to be viewed by teenagers, and, last, those intended only for adult consumption.

— J.M. Yogeshchandrasinh (Rajkot)

A tired ritual

This refers to ‘Toll in Himachal bus tragedy touches 23’ (IE, August 22). The Himachal bus mishap is the second big accident in less than a month. Twenty-three people have been killed. India’s roads have acquired a reputation, quite deservedly, of being the most dangerous in the world. In absolute numbers, more people die in road accidents in India than in any other country. To form a committee to look into the reasons for the accident, express shock and give compensation has become a ritual. To avoid frequent accidents, improving road systems, public lighting and signage, and upgrading licensing practices are essential.

— S.K. Khosla (Chandigarh)

Democracy in peril?

This refers to the editorial ‘What Nawaz has lost’ (IE, August 22). By ceding ground to the army, Nawaz Sharif has played into its hands. The army successfully encouraged Tahir-ul Qadri and Imran Khan, a political lightweight, to raise the ante of their protests against Nawaz Sharif. Having secured a “legitimate” reason to interfere, the army is hogging the limelight. Nawaz Sharif has few choices left. Standing up to the army isn’t one of them. Judging by its track record, the army isn’t going to silently step back before extracting its pound of flesh. Is democracy in peril in Pakistan, yet again?

— Ashok Goswami (Mumbai)