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Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Forty Years Ago, April 27, 1980: Ganga Dialogue

The Indian delegation virtually made it clear to the Bangladesh delegation that the commission was not in a position to bridge the gulf separating the positions of the two governments and as such it was better the two governments themselves took up the task.

By: Express News Service | Published: April 27, 2020 3:33:51 am
Joint Rivers Commission, India and Bangladesh, sharing Ganga waters, Forty years ago, indian express news The Commission was busy discussing whether the issue of augmentation of the Ganga waters should be remitted back to the two governments for resolution.

The Joint Rivers Commission of India and Bangladesh, currently in session in Delhi, is about to throw up its hands in despair over failure to resolve the differences between the two countries on the sharing of the Ganga waters. Rather than going into the pros and cons of the positions of the two countries, the Commission was busy discussing whether the issue of augmentation of the Ganga waters should be remitted back to the two governments for resolution. The Indian delegation virtually made it clear to the Bangladesh delegation that the commission was not in a position to bridge the gulf separating the positions of the two governments and as such it was better the two governments themselves took up the task.

Assam bandh

Even as the five-day picketing of government offices by the agitating organisations ended in Assam, associations of state and central government employees announced that they would abstain from work on Monday. The All Assam Employees Parishad decided to “boycott offices” in protest against the suspension of employees for taking part in the “current peaceful movement” on the foreign national issue. The central and semi-central employees parishad has also decided to call upon its members to stay away from work for a day in response to the state government employees’ appeal.

US on Iran mission

With unanswered questions and future intentions left dangling, the Jimmy Carter administration is reacting with unusual calm to the failure of its dramatic effort to free the US hostages in Teheran. Despite the loss of eight American military men, whose bodies were left behind in blazing aircraft wreckage on an Iranian salt desert, the response of President Jimmy Carter and key associates is in no way reminiscent of past moments of national dejection at daring plans gone awry. Instead of exhibiting the never-again attitude shown by the then President John Kennedy after the abortive 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba by

US-backed Cuban exiles, few officials in Washington seem willing to say that another Iran rescue mission might not go forward in the near future.

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