Forty Years Ago, September 6, 1978: Delhi Floods

The water level of the Yamuna had risen to 207.47 metre by 9.45 pm. It is continuing to rise, according to the flood control department. The situation, according to the department, is “very dangerous”.

By: Editorial | Updated: September 6, 2018 12:05:13 am
Forty Years Ago, September 6, 1978: Delhi Floods The Indian Express’ Front Page (Archive)

The water level of the Yamuna had risen to 207.47 metre by 9.45 pm. It is continuing to rise, according to the flood control department. The situation, according to the department, is “very dangerous”. A spokesman said water has reached the doorsteps in Kalindi Colony in South Delhi. The Yamuna waters have neared the Indraprastha power station, but the installation itself was safe, an official said. The flood waters have invaded Shanti Van and Vijay Ghat, the samadhis of Jawaharlal Nehru and Lal Bahadur Shastri. Rajghat, the samadhi of Mahatma Gandhi, which is also in line with the other samadhis but at a higher level, is unaffected. Floods have also submerged the Nigambodh cremation ghat, hearses stood outside the main entrance to take the dead being brought there to other crematoriums in the capital. The electricity was also cut off.

Yamuna Rising

The next 24 hours are critical for the flood-affected Delhi. The Yamuna is rising alarmingly at the rate of 10-cm an hour, after flooding such densely populated areas as Model Town and Hakikat Nagar near Delhi University. About 3.5 lakh people are affected and 40,000 have already been evacuated, excluding 80 per cent of the people of Jahangirpuri who have been moved to safety.

AIR Off Air

Delhi  “B”, Vividh Bharati and Yuv Vani frequencies of All India Radio went off the air today as waters knocked out the transmitters along the Mall Road in the capital. A skeleton broadcasting service was being maintained only on Delhi “A”. The transmitters for Delhi “A” are located at Nangloi, which is also under water, but the transmitter is luckily functioning. It did, however, go off the air for some time. Some of the high-power shortwave transmitters have also been affected but those at Khanpur continue to be active.

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