View From The Right: Pakistan Changing?https://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/view-from-the-right-pakistan-changing/

View From The Right: Pakistan Changing?

An editorial in the Organiser expresses the hope that Pakistan will soon take steps to ensure peace in the region. Noting that “Pakistan has been regarded as a rogue state”, it lists some recent developments and says “there are indications that Pakistan may think of taming the rogue elements nurtured as foreign policy instruments over […]

An editorial in the Organiser expresses the hope that Pakistan will soon take steps to ensure peace in the region. Noting that “Pakistan has been regarded as a rogue state”, it lists some recent developments and says “there are indications that Pakistan may think of taming the rogue elements nurtured as foreign policy instruments over a period of time”. Contending that the Islamic ideology that became the basis for Pakistan’s creation is “challenged by a more radicalised version”, it asserts that the elites of Pakistan are the target of attacks by these radicals: “Pakistan has no option but to act seriously against the rogue elements that can become [the] IS within Pakistan…”

People in Pakistan have enough exposure to see the progress made by other South Asian countries, the editorial says, adding that the “media in Pakistan are vocal about the achievements of Bharat in terms of creating democratic institutions, attaining technological advancement and a sustained growth rate”. It’s not still clear whether Maulana Masood Azhar has been arrested or detained, but his gestures show “that everything [is] not well with the ISI-backed terror outfit”. It doesn’t mean that Pakistan “will drastically transform anti-Bharat policies as that will weaken the very edifice of [the] creation of Pakistan”. Yet, it’s likely that “Pakistan would alter its foreign policy based on the instrument of terror…”

Kaliachak Fire

An article in Panchajanya comments on the Malda violence that was “ignored by the West Bengal government”. While “communal fanatics” created havoc, the incident is said to be linked to “conspirators in Bangladesh who deal with fake Indian currency and the trade of illegal weapons”. Noting that many in the mob of nearly 1.5 lakh carried “Pakistani flags”, the article says that there was no reason for the crowd to “suddenly turn fanatic”. After setting a police station on fire, the mob targeted a Hindu colony, attacked a “Shani and
Durga temple”, “looted innocent citizens and shopkeepers”.

The sequence of events shows that the mob had ulterior motives. “It is believed that the violence was planned in Bangladesh,” the article says, adding that Hindus constitute merely 10 per cent of the Kaliachak block, while the remaining 90 per cent are Muslims. “It seems that the first target of the fanatics was to force these Hindus to flee the area,” it says. Noting that “this border zone is fast becoming a centre of anti-national activities,” the article argues that “if the state government continues to follow vote-bank politics and turn a blind eye, then this fire can spread.”

Cinema & the Rasas

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An article in the Organiser advocates the incorporation of ancient Indian creative wisdom in the field of cinema. Noting that filmmaker Shyam Benegal now heads the committee on censor board reforms, which “will also take note of the best practices in various parts of the world”, it says that “no effort is undertaken to revive the ancient knowledge of creative performing arts and related aesthetics”.

“Natyashastra, an ancient Bharateeya treatise on the performing arts was written by the sage Bharata,” it says, adding that “the entire recital of the shastra occurs through a dialogue between Bharata and the sages, wherein the muni makes an inquiry into the origin of drama and related techniques”. The article points out that “Lord Brahma created drama so that the knowledge of the Vedas becomes accessible to all”.

The most pertinent part of the Natyashastra is the theory of rasa, “the cumulative result of vibhava (stimulus), anubhava (involuntary reaction), and vyabhikari bhava (voluntary reaction)”. Listing the eight rasas, it names some popular Hindi movies that incorporated these rasas and adds that the treatise “stands as a reflection of what our cinema is and ought to be”. The article then says, “Hope the new committee on censor board reforms takes a leaf from this ancient wisdom…”