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Sunday, December 15, 2019

The Urdu Press: Judges’ Dissent

Maulana Asrar-ul-Haque Qasimi, in his signed column in Rashtriya Sahara on January 16, writes: “If the Chief Justice of India has taken to allocating cases with far-reaching effects on the politics and society of the country, to benches of his own liking, and not on the basis of merits, anybody would understand that he wants […]

Updated: January 26, 2018 12:05:11 am
Supreme Court, Dipak Misra, Supreme Cuort crisis, Judge Loya death, Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu, Benjamin Netanyahu india visit, PM modi, Haj subsidy, indian express The Supreme Court. (Express Photo by Tashi Tobgyal)

Maulana Asrar-ul-Haque Qasimi, in his signed column in Rashtriya Sahara on January 16, writes: “If the Chief Justice of India has taken to allocating cases with far-reaching effects on the politics and society of the country, to benches of his own liking, and not on the basis of merits, anybody would understand that he wants judgments of his own liking. This would signal an end to the spirit of justice… In fact, the four senior judges have tried to convey, indirectly, that a process of interference by the government, and the executive, in the functioning of the judiciary has begun. If the chief justice is taking decisions under the influence of the executive, and not independently, and allocating important cases to the judges of his choice, justice is killed even before it could be done in these cases.”

On the controversy surrounding the death of Judge Brij Mohan Loya, who was hearing the Sohrabuddin encounter case, Siasat’s, editorial of January 16 notes: “What was the need for the statement by Anuj Loya, the son of the late judge (appealing for not politicising his father’s death and stating that he does not want to blame anyone for it)? Was pressure exerted on him by representatives of the government? The four senior Supreme Court judges too have hinted at the possibility of a conspiracy… The campaign has almost started for the general elections of 2019. Workers of the ruling party are active. The party’s president has been saved in the Sohrabuddin case. But it has become

necessary to put this case on record. By shooting the first arrow, the four senior Supreme Court judges created anxieties for the government. Now, the government wants to suppress the matter with the help of family members of Judge Loya… It is necessary to act dispassionately to preserve the judiciary’s dignity.”

Netanyahu’s visit

Jamaat-e-Islami’s bi-weekly, Daawat, in its front page commentary on January 17, notes: “The manner in which Prime Minister Narendra Modi welcomed the Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu in Delhi was extraordinary… Agreements were signed in seven important sectors and it is being said that India would benefit immensely from these agreements… It is very surprising that the Israeli government did not seem to be even a bit angry at the Indian vote against Israel at the UN on Jerusalem. The secret is that India must have voted after taking Israel into confidence… In the realm of security, Israel has a position of dominance over India. Most of India’s security needs are met by Israel.”

Etemaad ‘s editorial of January 15 notes: “India has been a supporter of the Palestinian cause right from the beginning. But Modi’s closeness to Israel, gives a wrong message to the world… India has been moving closer to Israel for inviting larger investments. In doing so, India seems to be ignoring the adverse effects this would have in diplomatic relations with other countries. Apart from the 20 crore Muslims, a large section of the people of the country has reservations about relations with Israel. This factor too is being ignored.”

Akhbar-e -Mashriq’s editorial of January 17 notes: “Now that India and Israel have moved close to each other, it is India’s duty to exert pressure on Israel to put an end to its conflict with Palestine. Modi would do a great favour to both Israel and Palestine if he uses his office to solve this longstanding problem.”

Haj subsidy

Welcoming the government’s announcement about the withdrawal of subsidy on Haj travel as riddance from a burden, Roznama Khabrein’s editorial of January 18 notes: “The Haj subsidy was a lie, a deception and a wrong representation of facts. Not even one per cent of it used to be passed on to the Hajis. In normal times, an air ticket for Saudi Arabia would cost Rs 32,000. But during the days of Haj , it would come to anything between Rs 60,000 and Rs one lakh. The government helped its doddering airline and painted that as a favourable treatment for Hajis. The Modi government should be thanked for ridding the pilgrims of a burden of concession that actually did not exist…The good intentions of the government would be proved only when it follows up by making Haj travel cheaper through a system of open tendering for all airlines, and not forcing Hajis to travel by one particular airline (Air India).”

Etemaad, organ of the All-India Majlis-e-Ittehad-ul-Muslemeen, in its editorial on January 17, writes: “The government should spend the Rs 700 crore, thus saved, on the education of Muslims. This should be done for both Muslim boys and girls, and not only for girls.”

Group editor of Rashtriya Sahara, Syed Faisal Ali, in his signed column on January 21, writes: “The question now is if the government would act similarly on the expenses made on religious occasions of other communities as well, that are in the nature of Haj subsidy. The Bihar government paid for the entire expenses on the recent celebration of Guru Gobind Singh’s anniversary. The Centre spent Rs 1,150 crore on the Kumbh Mela at Allahabad in 2014… A payment of Rs 3,400 crore was made for the Ujjain Mahakumbh. The government also spends for the Kailash Mansarovar Yatra.”

Compiled by Seema Chishti

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