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Wednesday, July 18, 2018

The Urdu Press: Bypoll Lessons

Siasat, in its editorial on March 16, writes: “In the constituencies of Gorakhpur and Phulpur in Uttar Pradesh, the previous results had indicated that it would not be easy to beat the BJP."

Updated: March 30, 2018 12:36:03 am
Gorakhpur Assembly By-Election, Gorakhpur Assembly By-Polls, Gorakhpur By-Polls, BJP, Upendra Shukla, Kaushlendra Singh Patel, India News, Indian Express, Indian Express News Roznama Khabrein, in its editorial on the same day, writes: “The ruling party is now completely intoxicated by its position in power. It thinks that the people are fools and only the pride of being Hindu is enough for them.”

Commenting on the defeat of the BJP in the recent by-elections to the Lok Sabha in UP and Bihar, Siasat, in its editorial on March 16, writes: “In the constituencies of Gorakhpur and Phulpur in Uttar Pradesh, the previous results had indicated that it would not be easy to beat the BJP. Some sections considered a BJP defeat in Gorakhpur almost impossible. But a decision by BSP chief Mayawati made the almost impossible feat possible. In a way, this result worked to raise the morale of anti-BJP parties for the Lok Sabha elections in 2019…. Those parties that are actually concerned about the future of secularism in the country and do not want that communalists and fascists should make efforts for a wider national unity, making the contest against the BJP in the 2019 elections easier.”

Roznama Khabrein, in its editorial on the same day, writes: “The ruling party is now completely intoxicated by its position in power. It thinks that the people are fools and only the pride of being Hindu is enough for them. Certainly, this fact can be used by its opponents to enthuse people, create unity among them and bring together different castes…Will the opposition parties learn any lessons from their recent victories and avoid the mistake of becoming over-confident like the BJP, something that Yogi Adityanath lamented about soon after his party’s defeat in Gorakhpur?”

In the aftermath of the Rajya Sabha defeat of the BSP candidate, Inquilab, in an editorial on March 25 notes: “UP CM Yogi Adityanath and other BJP leaders who had thought that the defeat of the BSP candidate due to cross-voting would create a crack in the alliance, got a rude shock. BSP leader Satish Mishra, and then Mayawati herself, said publicly that the defeat would have no bearing on the alliance and the objective was to defeat the BJP.”

Data Leak
Commenting on the controversy on data leak connected with the work of Cambridge Analytica (CA), Inquilab, in its editorial on March 27, writes: “The war of words is going on between the BJP and Congress because the former feels that the Congress has started making effective use of social media and other platforms, has adversely affected BJP’s ability to spread untruths and falsehoods before the people. It was the BJP that started the war of words around CA.

Roznama Khabrein in a commentary on March 25 writes: “IT Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad should have stated if the government has ever filed a case against Google and Facebook or revealed their unfair practises. The EU had imposed a fine of € 24 billion on Google in June 2017 because it was establishing its dominance through incorrect means. If the government has a stirring case against Facebook, can it say what cases it has unearthed about theft of people’s personal details?”

Right to Die
Commenting on the Supreme Court judgment on Euthanasia, AIMIM’s Etemaad, in its editorial on March 10, writes: “Life and death are not under the control of human beings. In different faiths, deaths are natural, that is, given by God. Deaths in accidents and wars are unnatural, but they too are beyond human control. And, to desire for death, or embracing death by oneself is called suicide that is forbidden (haraam) in Islam. Such deaths have been declared illegal in all Muslim countries. The Roman Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church are strong opponents of such deaths.”

Editor of Inquilab, Shakeel Shamsi, in his signed column on March 11, writes: “The Supreme Court’s judgement compels a common man to think why, when a person’s life has ended, should he be kept alive with the help of medicines and scientific tools? Therefore, the Supreme Court’s judgement is not speaking about giving death to anybody. Instead, it is prohibiting keeping one alive forcibly.”

Rashtriya Sahara, in its editorial on March 11, warns: “In the light of the Supreme Court’s judgment it would be extremely difficult to stop misuse of Euthanasia (despite the proposed mechanisms of living will etc, propounded by the court). The best courts can also commit mistakes. People can present false witnesses and an innocent person can die.”

Farmers’ March
Munsif, in its editorial on March 14, writes: “Looking at the massive rally of farmers, the Maharashtra government found it convenient to accept their demands even before its culmination… It should be noted that among the most important demands of the farmers were waiving off their debts and transfer of ownership of lands cultivated by tribal farmers… In this connection, the government made an announcement about the formation of a committee to inquire about the period for which such farmers have been cultivating those forest lands. The government has decided to transfer the forest lands that are under cultivation by a tribal farmer from a time prior to 2005 to the farmer concerned…In the past, the Central government announced a special package for farmers of Vidarbha and other areas of Maharashtra and the present government too had announced a scheme for waiving off the debts of farmers. Despite this, there has been no improvement in the condition of farmers… In such a situation, all that can be said is that the actual benefits of such schemes are not reaching those that deserve them. If it is so, it is a failure of the government.”

Compiled by Seema Chishti

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