View From The Right: Respecting Rightshttps://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/bhopal-encounter-kashmir-unrest-india-pakistan-relation-4364869/

View From The Right: Respecting Rights

It admits that while the argument of “whether charges levelled against them of heinous crimes were proved in the court of law or not” is valid, “jailbreak and killing of a guard prove their criminal tendencies”.

The editorial in Organiser comments on the Bhopal encounter and slams those who doubted the veracity of the state’s version. “Some even went up to comparing the state of minorities in Pakistan and Bangladesh with that of Muslims in Bharat,” the editorial says. It underlines that the operation was carried out by policemen after one of their colleagues was killed. “It is certainly not a communal or a majority-minority issue,” it notes, adding that “SIMI is a banned organisation” and that the undertrials killed “were activists of the same is beyond doubt”. It admits that while the argument of “whether charges levelled against them of heinous crimes were proved in the court of law or not” is valid, “jailbreak and killing of a guard prove their criminal tendencies”. “The dilemma of protecting human rights while preventing terrorism is a haunting one for all democracies,” the editorial argues, emphasising that “you have to stand for the human rights of a person who does not believe in them”. “In cases like that of Yakub Memon or Ajmal Kasab, our system has shown the utmost respect for such rights of the terrorists,” the editorial says.

Government’s failure

An article in Organiser comments on the recent “mysterious” burning of schools in the Kashmir Valley by “terrorists” and “supported by Pakistan”. It says “the Jammu and Kashmir High Court ultimately stepped in to save the younger generation and to save Kashmir from becoming Afghanistan or Syria”. The court said, the article notes, “the mysterious enemies of education should be unmasked and dealt with an iron hand”, and sought “a comprehensive and consolidated compliance report from the government within a week”. “Failure of the authorities to check burning of schools shows that the government has virtually surrendered its authority to the separatists,” it says, adding that “the politics of protecting vote-banks overweighed the need to govern and to nip trouble in the bud”.

Though “27 schools have been burnt, the Kashmiri leadership has not learnt the right kind of lessons”. The Centre has asked the Mehbooba Mufti government to “make efforts for reopening the schools, which have been closed for more than 110 days due to unrest in the Valley”. Six schools have been torched in Kulgam district that falls in the PDP’s stronghold of South Kashmir. “Interestingly, the school dropout Burhan Wani’s own district of Pulwama is the only district in Kashmir where no educational institute has perished in fire during the turbulence,” it says.

Advising Tata

An article in Panchjanya urges the Tata Group to resolve its differences. “Tata is a huge brand,” the article says, and underlines that “the issues within the group are not of any family shop in which the owner can remove or hire anybody”. The family of Cyrus Mistry holds nearly 18.5 per cent shares of Tata Sons. Mistry was part owner of the company as well as a manager in it. A majority of big companies face similar challenges when the owner is in a managerial position. “There are many companies in which promoters having ownership have distanced themselves from a managerial role,” it says. Therefore, it was surprising that one of the owners, Mistry, was removed. Having ownership of the company is no guarantee for having some say in its management, the article argues. Noting that the board of the Tata Sons had praised Mistry in June 2016, it asks: “How has the entire scene changed in just four months?” It also asks Mistry “why he failed to establish communication with the top management?”