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Not enough ground to summon Modi: Nanavati

The Nanavati-Mehta Commission,probing the 2002 Godhra train carnage and the subsequent riots in Gujarat,has refused to...

Written by Express News Service | Ahmedabad |
September 20, 2009 4:01:15 am

The Nanavati-Mehta Commission,probing the 2002 Godhra train carnage and the subsequent riots in Gujarat,has refused to summon Chief Minister Narendra Modi and six others to examine their role in the riots.

The Commission,however,did direct the then Personal Assistants of Modi — Omprakash Singh,Tanmay Mehta and Sanjay Bhavsar — to file affidavits giving details of their telephone conversation during the 2002 communal clash. The NGO Jan Sangharsh Manch had alleged in its application that some CMO officials were in constant contact with some of the riot-accused,including former VHP leader Jaidip Patel and Babu Bajrangi.

In its 27-page order dated September 18,the Commission has indicated that the material produced by advocate Mukul Sinha on behalf of the NGO Jan Sangharsh Manch is not enough to summon these people. “If the submissions made by the applicant is accepted then,apart from the Chief Minister and other Ministers,all the Government officials and officers of the police force will have to be summoned,as they were directly concerned with maintaining law and order,” observed the Commission. “We are of the view that not all but only those persons against whom there is some material to show their involvement in the post-Godhra incidents should be summoned and that too at an appropriate stage,” the Commission observed.

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