Follow Us:
Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Music This Week

In their haunting 2006 album,The Town and the City,Los Lobos connected a pensive,introspective mood to the journeys of immigrants and restless travelers.

Written by New York Times | Published: August 7, 2010 12:26:07 am

Los Lobos

Tin Can Trust

Proper Records

Rating: ***

In their haunting 2006 album,The Town and the City,Los Lobos connected a pensive,introspective mood to the journeys of immigrants and restless travelers. Tin Can Trust is a strong sequel.

The album opens with Burn It Down by Los Lobos’s main songwriting team: its singer and player of anything with strings,David Hidalgo,and its drummer,Louie Pérez. In a Celtic-tinged modal tune with fiddle and Conrad Lozano’s upright bass,Hidalgo sings,“The time had come for me to run away,” and adds,“Once I go there is no coming back.”

Cesar Rosas,the band’s other guitarist and songwriter,and its raspier lead singer,also sees flames and farewells in the mournful All My Bridges Burning,written with the Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter. Another voyage is summed up in the Hidaldo-Pérez song 21 Spanishes,a reimagining of the Spanish arrival in the Americas and its aftermath: “Their blood was often mixed/Now they all hang out together,and play guitar for kicks.”

For most of the album,tempos are slow and deliberate,with only a few upbeat diversions; minor chords predominate. Jupiter or the Moon is aching and bereft,as Hidalgo sings,“Where did you go,go so soon?” In Tin Can Trust,he’s in love but utterly destitute.

It’s an album about facing limitations,drawing what hope there is from seeing each situation clearly.

For all the latest News Archive News, download Indian Express App

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement