Type-2 diabetes can be detected 20 years before diagnosis: Studyhttps://indianexpress.com/article/lifestyle/health/type-2-diabetes-can-be-detected-20-years-before-diagnosis-5390350/

Type-2 diabetes can be detected 20 years before diagnosis: Study

The study, that was published in The Journal of Endocrine Society, investigated the body mass indexes (BMI), insulin sensitivity and fasting blood sugar levels of 27,000 non-diabetic individuals, from the age of 20 and 50. A higher BMI is indicative of type-2 diabetes.

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Lifestyle changes can prevent the onset of diabetes. (Source: File Photo)

A new study has revealed that it is possible to detect type-2 diabetes 20 years before it is actually diagnosed. High fasting blood sugar levels and insulin resistance are considered to be factors that signal the onset of diabetes. According to the BBC, the study suggests that timely measures must be taken to curb this. The report also quotes another study according to which type-1 diabetes might be misdiagnosed in individuals after the age of 30.

The study, that was published in The Journal of Endocrine Society, investigated the body mass indexes (BMI), insulin sensitivity and fasting blood sugar levels of 27,000 non-diabetic individuals, from the age of 20 and 50. A higher BMI is indicative of type-2 diabetes. The study was carried out for 11 years, from 2005 to 2016 and tracked the concerned individuals till type-2 diabetes had set in.

Over the years, 1,067 new type-2 diabetes cases were diagnosed. It was deduced by the researchers that those who suffered from type-2 diabetes later in their lives had insulin resistance, high fasting blood sugar levels and higher BMIs, even 10 years before the condition was diagnosed. Since most people who suffer from type-2 diabetes initially go through a pre-diabetes stage, researchers have concluded that the causative factors should b identified.

“Because trials of prevention in people with pre-diabetes seem to be less successful over long-term follow-up, we may need to intervene much earlier than the pre-diabetes stage to prevent progression to full blown diabetes. A much earlier intervention trail, either drug or lifestyle-related, is warranted,” Dr Hiroyuki Sagesaka, who led the research, said.