Study shows age boys reach puberty linked to mothers

Women who reported to have hit menstruation sooner than their peers had sons who exhibited early signs of puberty. The report also suggests that their daughters too apparently develop breats six months earlier than their contemporaries.

By: Lifestyle Desk | New Delhi | Published: October 15, 2018 8:09:29 am

mother menstruation, son puberty, mother menstruation son puberty, indian express, indian express news In order to arrive at the result, the study examined data of almost 16,000 Danish mothers and children. (Source: Getty Images)

The age at which boys hit puberty is linked to when their mothers had their first period, according to a study. A BBC report notes that the findings of the study revealed that women who hit menstruation earlier than their peers had sons who exhibited early signs of puberty. The report also suggests that their daughters too apparently develop breasts six months earlier than their contemporaries. In order to arrive at the result, the study, published in the journal Human Reproduction, examined data of almost 16,000 Danish mothers and children.

“Whenever a doctor meets a patient with delayed or early onset of puberty, the doctor obtains a family history. The relationship between the mother’s pubertal age and the son’s pubertal age has been taken as common knowledge but now our data from a large study confirms it,” says Dr Nis Brix, one of the authors of the study.

A study in 2015, as quoted by the report, had identified obesity, diabetes as supposed risks of early or late onset of puberty. “Both genetic and environmental factors undoubtedly influence puberty timing,” said Dr Christine Wohlfahrt-Veje, a researcher at the University of Copenhagen and one of the lead authors on a study in 2016 looking at puberty and timing,” says Dr Christine Wohlfahrt-Veje, one of the lead authors of a study that examined looking puberty and timing in 2016.

“Boys and girls inherit from both mothers and fathers – but early pubertal markers, onset of breasts and pubic hair, in girls are less dependent on genetic and hence more on environmental factors such as childhood growth patterns and possibly other environmental exposures,” the doctor added.

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