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Lancet study: 34 per cent of Indians insufficiently active

The study, based on self-reported activity levels, including activity at work and at home, for transport, and during leisure time, in adults aged 18 years and older from 358 population-based surveys in 168 countries.

In 2016, India ranked 52nd (with 1 being the most inactive, and 168 being the most active) among 168 countries, which means India is in the top third of inactive countries. (Representational Image) (Illustration: CR Sasikumar)

At least 34 per cent of India’s population is insufficiently active, according to a new Lancet study published online on Tuesday. The levels of insufficient activity were higher among women at 48 per cent, while the prevalence was 22 per cent among men.

In 2016, around one in three women (32%) and one in four men (23%) worldwide were not reaching the recommended levels of physical activity to stay healthy — which is at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week.

The study was undertaken by researchers from World Health Organisation (WHO) and published in the Lancet Global Health journal. Dr Regina Guthold of WHO, Switzerland, and main author of the study told The Indian Express that cities needed to be more “walk friendly” and more opportunities for physical activity in public open spaces and parks in workplaces need to be created.

In 2016, India ranked 52nd (with 1 being the most inactive, and 168 being the most active) among 168 countries, which means India is in the top third of inactive countries.

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Researchers in their analysis included data from nearly 2 million participants (representing 96% of the global population), which shows that globally, in 2016, more than a quarter of all adults was not getting enough physical activity. This puts more than 1.4 billion adults at risk of developing or exacerbating diseases linked to inactivity, and needs to be urgently addressed, Dr Guthold said.

The study, based on self-reported activity levels, including activity at work and at home, for transport, and during leisure time, in adults aged 18 years and older from 358 population-based surveys in 168 countries.

The WHO Global Action Plan on Physical Activity (2018-30) provides a selection of policy options targeting different settings and population groups that can be adapted and tailored to local contexts in all countries. In wealthier countries, the transition towards more sedentary occupations, recreation and motorised transport could explain the higher levels of inactivity, while in lower-income countries, more activity is undertaken at work and for transport, according to Dr Guthold.

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“This is true in India while on the other hand poverty and undernutrition persist in some population groups, leading to a “double burden” of disease with persisting infectious diseases, and non-communicable diseases on the rise,” she said.

First published on: 05-09-2018 at 04:25:01 am
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