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Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Five yoga poses that can lower your risk of having a stroke

These asanas can be done to improve overall health and reduce the risk of stroke, provided you try to hold each pose for 30 seconds

By: Lifestyle Desk | New Delhi |
September 28, 2021 6:30:55 pm
yoga asanas, asanas that can reduce the risk of stroke, asanas for stroke, yoga to lower the risk of stroke, yoga and health, indian express newsWhile nothing can absolutely replace modern medicine, yoga can, to a great extent, lower the risk of many health conditions, stroke being one of them. (Photo: Getty/Thinkstock)

There is no denying that yoga has many health benefits. Individually, there are asanas that target different parts of the body — from head to toe — to relieve the person and help them lead a better and healthier life.

While nothing can absolutely replace modern medicine, yoga can, to a great extent, lower the risk of many health conditions, stroke being one of them. Grand Master Akshar — a philanthropist, spiritual master, lifestyle coach, yoga-preneur and author — says yoga is best practised if you want to prevent a stroke, but it can also help older stroke survivors improve their sense of balance and become more active.

“A stroke occurs when a part of the brain stops getting the steady supply of oxygen-rich blood. Fragile brain tissue gets damaged, and this depends on what part of the brain is affected. It can be caused by a blockage in a vessel supplying blood to the brain, or because a blood vessel in the brain is ruptured,” he says.

He lists five asanas that can be done to improve overall health and reduce the risk of stroke, adding that one must try to hold each pose for 30 seconds and repeat for up to three sets.

Paschimottanasana — Seated forward bend

* Begin by stretching your legs forward; ensure that your knees are slightly bent.
* Extend your arms upward and keep your spine erect.
* Exhale and empty your stomach of air.
* With the exhale, bend forward at the hip and place your upper body on your lower body.
* Lower your arms and grip your big toes with your fingers.
* Try to touch your knees with your nose. Hold the posture for 10 seconds.

Padahastasana

* Begin by standing in Samasthiti.
* Exhale and gently bend your upper body down from the hips and touch your nose to your knees.
* Place palms on either side of your feet.
* Slowly straighten your knees and try to bring your chest to your thighs.
* Hold this asana for a while.

Dhanurasana

* Begin by lying down on your stomach.
* Bend your knees and hold your ankles with your palms.
* Have a strong grip.
* Lift your legs and arms as high as you can.
* Look up and hold the posture for a while.

Bhujangasana (Cobra Pose)

* Lie down flat on your stomach with your palms placed under your shoulders.
* Bring your feet together, keeping your toes on the ground.
* Take a deep breath in, hold it as you then lift your head, shoulders and torso up.
* Lift up at a 30 degree angle but ensure you are keeping your navel on the floor.
* Broaden out your shoulders with your head slightly raised upwards.
* To release, gently and slowly lower your torso and then exhale.

Samasthithi/Tadasana

* Stand tall with big toes touching and heels together.
* Draw in your abdominals and relax your shoulders down and back.
* Take 5-8 breaths while actively engaging your leg muscles.
* It’s a great pose for seniors to keep their postures tall and strong.

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📣 The above article is for information purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the guidance of your doctor or other qualified health professional for any questions you may have regarding your health or a medical condition.

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