scorecardresearch
Follow Us:
Tuesday, January 18, 2022

Jain-uinely Good

A visit to the new Marwari restaurant at The Ashok is as smooth as the khandvi served there.

Written by Shantanu David | New Delhi |
September 1, 2012 11:26:39 pm

A visit to the new Marwari restaurant at The Ashok is as smooth as the khandvi served there.

This assignment,we admit,we faced with a certain trepidation. It’s not as if we dislike vegetarian food; we just try and avoid it as much as possible. Nevertheless,we made our way to Shraman — the new Jain and Marwari fine dining eatery at The Ashok. The journey turned out to be longer than usual as there are no signs to the restaurant and we ended up spending about 20 minutes meandering through the echoing halls of the hotel.

The interiors are done up in an appropriately Rajasthani manner. The walls are a pastel blue,with occasional murals and relief tile work. The furniture consists of modernistic,faux Rajasthani chairs and tables (really,the only way to describe them) and the service staff is polite,efficient and well informed about the offerings.

The menu is divided into three categories: Marwari,generic Jain and North Indian. Ignoring the last one,we charted new territories — diving into the Jain and Marwari sections. The manager,seeing our mystified expressions,made some helpful suggestions,which we gratefully followed. We started with a mixed platter of Jain and Marwari appetisers,including Paan Patta Chaat,Jodhpuri Mirchi ka Pakora,Kalmi Vada,Dhokla aur Khandvi ki Chaat and Dahi ka Samosa. The dhokla and khandvi chaat tastes exactly how it sounds,with pieces of tangy,soft dhokla and restrained khandvi served with a splash of mint and tamarind chutney,and beaten curd. While the pakora and the samosa are palatable,even if a little bland,it is the paan chaat that grabs attention. It’s basically deep-fried betel leaves tossed in the usual chaat accoutrement,but the springy aftertaste of the leaves is a fantastic palate cleanser.

For the main course,we were served Rajma Rasille,Gatta Curry,Rajasthani Papad aur Mangori ki Subji,accompanied by assorted breads. Considering everything is made without onions and garlic,the robustness of flavours far exceeds our expectations. Being typical Dilliwallahs,we naturally loved the rajma — which is creamier and with a more sober flavour than we’re normally used to. To be honest,we didn’t see the reason for all the hullabaloo behind gatta curry. On the other hand,the subji — comprising sun-dried gram dumplings cooked in a curry heavily infused with asafoetida,and a last-minute sprinkling of crisp papad — is a great discovery,given its unusual taste and multidimensional texture.

For dessert,we are thrilled to have been acquainted with Ghewar Malai Mishri,a traditional Rajasthani dessert. Rounded wheat cakes drenched in sugar syrup,covered with cream and studded with mishri — this is tooth-achingly sweet and so,we love it.

Despite its vegetarian,no onion,no garlic roots (pun unintended),we were quite happy with this introduction to Marwari fare. Another major plus is the extremely modest bill of fare,considering it’s a five-star restaurant.

Meal for two: Rs. 1,000 (including taxes) Address: The Ashok,Chanakyapuri Contact: 24672384

📣 The Indian Express is now on Telegram. Click here to join our channel (@indianexpress) and stay updated with the latest headlines

For all the latest Lifestyle News, download Indian Express App.

  • Newsguard
  • The Indian Express website has been rated GREEN for its credibility and trustworthiness by Newsguard, a global service that rates news sources for their journalistic standards.
  • Newsguard
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement