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Wednesday, October 27, 2021

Adele reveals 2-3 times a day exercise routine; experts on why extreme workouts are not advisable

Experts say that only a limited amount of daily activity can help one feel energetic; excess may actually make one feel more fatigued.

By: Lifestyle Desk | New Delhi |
Updated: October 14, 2021 1:41:51 pm
adeleAdele revealed that she works out 2-3 times a day. (Source: Adele/Instagram)

In a recent interview, Adele opened up about her incredible weight loss and also shared how she got “addicted” to exercise and worked out two-three times a day, something she said also helped manage anxiety.

“It was because of my anxiety. Working out, I would just feel better. It was never about losing weight, it was always about becoming strong and giving myself as much time every day without my phone. I got quite addicted to it. I work out two or three times a day,” she told British Vogue.

However, should one exercise so much in a day? To understand more, we reached out to experts.

 

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A post shared by Adele (@adele)

Health experts, while commending her spirit, are of the opinion that extreme workouts, like everything else, are not advisable on a daily basis.

“Such intense workout regime is usually followed by athletes, who are used to it. If a normal individual works out 2-3 times, the body may not be able to bear it due to wear and tear of the muscles. A 24-hour gap is required for the body to recuperate after each work out. Working out is essential, but so is relaxation time for the body to regain strength. Too much of exercise in a day not only affects the body physically but is also mentally exhausting,” said Dr Abhishek Subhash, Consultant Internal Medicine at Bhatia Hospital.

Can such a routine be termed as over-exercising?

“Basically it depends on various factors like age, health, choice of workout and etc. As such, many times, extreme exercising puts extreme pressure on the cardiovascular system and may sometimes lead to heart damage, cause enlarged arteries or even heart rhythm disorders. So, scientifically, for an adult, five hours per week of moderate exercise or 2.5 hours of intense exercise or combination of the two are recommended. Anything more would be termed over-exercising with serious consequences,” said Dr Richa Kulkarni, chief consulting physiotherapist, Kinesis Sports Rehab.

During her interview with British Vogue, Adele elaborated her routine, sharing: “I do my weights in the morning, then I normally hike or I box in the afternoon, and then I go and do my cardio at night. I was basically unemployed when I was doing it. And I do it with trainers.”

Despite doing it with trainers, experts mention that only a limited amount of daily activity can help one feel energetic; excess may actually make one feel more fatigued. “Exercise is just like medicine. When we are doing the workouts in a scheduled manner, we feel full of positivity and energy. But an overdose can increase the risk of injuries and stress fractures. Instead of incessantly pumping iron or crushing cardio routine multiple times a day, one can follow a scheduled workout plan,” Dr Shuchin Bajaj, founder, and director, Ujala Cygnus Group of Hospitals told indianexpress.com.

Another important aspect is to pay attention to the amount of proteins and calories the body requires. “The more you workout, the more your body will require proteins and calories. This is not good. It is very important to consume the right amount as per your body weight,” noted Dr Abhishek.

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