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Have you crossed the five stages of love?

Researchers have identified five stages of love, which would decide whether you would be able to cement the relationship or leave midway.

By: Indo-Asian News Service | London |
November 3, 2014 2:56:34 pm
660 The five stages are: butterflies, building, assimilation, honesty and stability.

Researchers have identified five stages of love, which would decide whether you would be able to cement the relationship or leave midway.

Each stage can be relived and recaptured among couples, who face different life challenges together, said a latest survey by the UK dating website eHarmony.

The five stages are: butterflies, building, assimilation, honesty and stability.

The first stage increases libido and it also is a time when people almost forget to eat.

“Productivity is not great at this stage as people’s minds constantly wander. Interestingly, people tend to get pimples in the early stages of a relationship,” psychologist Linda Papadopoulos was quoted as saying.

In stage two, the body releases neurochemicals, triggering rushes of intense pleasure. It results in a feeling of ‘happy anxiety’.

“Love moves slightly further to the point where you are building your relationship,” Papadopoulos added.

As you reach the third stage, the question whether the relationship is right or wrong comes to the fore.

Stage four witnesses the first rise in stress levels.

Once the couple has crossed the first four stages, the last and final stage brings increased levels of trust and intimacy – leading to a stable relationship, MailOnline reported.

The survey found that 50 percent of respondents reached this stage while 23 percent reported feeling happier as a result.

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